Baby Bell

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Related to Baby bells: RBOC

Baby Bell

n.
Any of the regional telephone companies created in 1984 when AT&T was ordered to divest itself of its local telephone service operations.

[From (Ma) Bell, nickname for Bell Telephone Company, after Alexander Graham Bell.]
References in periodicals archive ?
The telecommunications industry was in flux at the time with the break up of AT & T into seven holding companies and 22 baby Bells.
7m local phone lines and generating USD117m in revenue, and would further the reunification of the Baby Bells, which were previously spun off from AT&T to enhance competition.
d) Only two remaining baby Bells would be left--huge Verizon in the Northeast and weak Qwest of the Western mountain states.
It will also see BellSouth return to its roots, as it and a number of other operators ( dubbed the Baby Bells ( were spun off from AT&T in the 1980s.
These adorable baby bells hold the perfect amount of spreadable butter for one person to enjoy.
While officials at this big giant lumbered along, its competitors, including the Baby Bells that were forcefully spun off in the mid 1980s, took risks and implemented programs that allowed them to leap ahead.
But the Baby Bells soon became adept at blocking competitors' access-to their lines.
At top speed, Korea's broadband connections over very high-bit digital subscriber lines (VDSL) are on average four times faster than the fastest broadband connections that the likes of Comcast, Time Warner or the Baby Bells provide in the U.
CAA rainmaker Mike Ovitz even convinced the Baby Bells to open their pocketbooks wide to attract a dream team of Hollywood heavyhitters to run the show and create content for those pipes: Among them, CBS/Broadcast Group president Howard Stringer, former Fox Entertainment prexy Sandy Grushow and then-Fox exec VP David Grant.
The Baby Bells, which own the wires connecting the vast majority of US homes and businesses to global communications networks and lease access, at regulated rates, to other companies that want to provide voice or data services, may have escaped the worst of the current telecom turmoil.
The bill would increase the power of the Baby Bells to offer their services to American homes.