bacchanal

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bac·cha·nal

 (băk′ə-năl′, -näl′, băk′ə-nəl)
n.
1. often bacchanals The Bacchanalia.
2. A participant in the Bacchanalia.
3. A drunken or riotous celebration.
4. A reveler.
adj.
Of, relating to, or typical of the worship of Bacchus.

[From Latin Bacchānālia; see Bacchanalia.]

bacchanal

(ˈbækənəl)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) a follower of Bacchus
2. a drunken and riotous celebration
3. a participant in such a celebration; reveller
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Bacchus
[C16: from Latin Bacchānālis; see Bacchus]

bac•cha•nal

(n. ˌbɑ kəˈnɑl, ˌbæk əˈnæl, ˈbæk ə nl; adj. ˈbæk ə nl)

n.
1. a worshipper of Bacchus.
2. a drunken reveler.
3. an occasion of drunken revelry; orgy; bacchanalia.
adj.
4. pertaining to Bacchus or the Bacchanalia.
[1530–40; < Latin Bacchānāl, derivative of Bacchus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacchanal - someone who engages in drinking boutsbacchanal - someone who engages in drinking bouts
imbiber, juicer, toper, drinker - a person who drinks alcoholic beverages (especially to excess)
2.bacchanal - a drunken revellerbacchanal - a drunken reveller; a devotee of Bacchus
buff, devotee, lover, fan - an ardent follower and admirer
3.bacchanal - a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuitybacchanal - a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
revel, revelry - unrestrained merrymaking
Adj.1.bacchanal - used of riotously drunken merrymakingbacchanal - used of riotously drunken merrymaking; "a night of bacchanalian revelry"; "carousing bands of drunken soldiers"; "orgiastic festivity"
drunk, inebriated, intoxicated - stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Dionysien par definition, Camus fait de la Mediterranee le spectacle de la bacchanale de lumiere et de mer, le carnaval de l'orgie sensualiste.
The concert, titled "Passion," will feature the two musicians along with other music that celebrates love, longing, and desire including Elgar's Salut D'Amour, the Bacchanale from Saint-Saens' "Samson and Delilah" and selections from Prokofiev's "Romeo and Juliet."
Then, they will begin playing Bacchanale by John Cage.
Avec comme introduction de bienvenue, [beaucoup moins que] la Bacchanale [beaucoup plus grand que] de Camille Saint-Saen, l'orchestre de l'Opera d'Alger, sous la direction musicale de Amine Kouider, a donne une empreinte de Chaabi a la composition francaise, et ce, avec, sur les devants de l'orchestration, le trio du repertoire : Mandole, Qanun, et banjo.
34/FS 89: Aladdin's Dream and Dance of the Morning Mist; Chinese Dance; The Market Place in Isfahan; Negro Dance; Marcel Khalife: From Concerto for Rababa and Orchestra: Third Movement; and Camille Saint-SaE1/2ns: From Samson and Delilah: Bacchanale. The tickets are priced QR125-175.
From Wagner's impassioned Ride of the Valkyries to Saint-Saens' riotous Bacchanale, it will be a thrilling evening of evocative music by the world's greatest composers, all culminating in Tchaikovsky's epic 1812 overture.
The inclusion on the album of the Bacchanale from Saint-Saens's opera Samson et Dalila and the Dance of the Seven Veils from Strauss's Salome can be viewed from two angles: either as part of the comprehensive artistic conception of the chosen title or as mere filler.
The score was a melange of the 1845 Dresden original, the 1861 Paris version (with longer and more interesting music for the ballet and Venus) and the 1875 Vienna revision wherein Wagner finally conjoined the originally free-standing overture and the ensuing Bacchanale. --Reviews from Chicago by Richard Covello
Her early career began quite promisingly with a 1917 purchase by the French government of her Bacchanale Russe (installed in the Luxembourg Gardens but then destroyed during World War II) and two private monument commissions, Sacrifice in 1920 for the Cathedral of St.
The program includes "Danse Bacchanale" from Emile Saint-Sa'ns' "Samson and Delilah;" Bloch's Schelomo for Cello and Orchestra; and Maurice Ravel's orchestration of Modest Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition."
Puri identifies the War Dance, Daybreak and Bacchanale movements from Daphnis as emblematic of this dialectic.