Bacharach

(redirected from Bacherach)
Related to Bacherach: Nikki Bacharach

Bacharach

(ˈbækəræk)
n
(Biography) Burt. born 1928, US composer of popular songs, usually with lyricist Hal David
References in periodicals archive ?
He covers displacement, relocation, and the dialectic of a constellation: Heine, critical theory, and the New York intellectuals; Heine's readers: Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud; Heine's dissonant aesthetics; the signifying lizard: language, sign, and play; Messiah in golden chains: deferred action and the concept of history; the comedy of body and mind: emancipation and the power of the affects; myths of Enlightenment: Heine's secularization narratives; and another Abraham, another Sarah: Heine's Frankfurt Shul in The Rabbi of Bacherach. (Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Heinrich Heine weighs in on the advantages to assimilation in this period with his fragmentary novel The Rabbi from Bacherach, where religiously raised Jewish children feel comforted when they hear the Tale of the Nibelungen from Father Rhein, the personification of a river that figures generally for German national myth and, in Heine's story, as a possible source of comfort for partially assimilated minorities.
Here, early and late works with more or less overt Jewish content are discussed and Der Rabbi von Bacherach in its various phases is analysed at length.
But Wirth-Nesher goes on to offer persuasive evidence that Howells's preference for "Yekl" over "Yankel" is drawn not from the former name's prevalence in the streets of the "New York Ghetto" evoked in Howells's subtitle but from the character "Jakel [Yekl] the Fool" in Heine's fragmentary novel The Rabbi of Bacherach (1840), a character whose name and whose talk both take place in a mock Frankfurt dialect the reader is meant to take as proto-Yiddish.
The volume's editor, Mark Gelber, demonstrates how Heine--and antisemitic writers later in the century--participates in the construction of the noble Sephardic Jew as an alternative to the degenerate or degenerating Ashkenaz in The Rabbi from Bacherach. The director of the Heinrich-Heine Institute in Dusseldorf, Joseph Kruse, provides insight on the difficulties of ascertaining the authenticity of objects and documents that can shed light on Heine's biography, in particular his early years, about which we know relatively little.
Laura Bacherach, beauty director of Company magazine, said: 'Beauty is not only about flawless features and perfect hair.
I would contend, however, that Lasker-Schfiler raises a question in "Der Wunderrabbiner von Barcelona" (1921) that is glossed over in its forerunner, Heine's "Der Rabbi von Bacherach": the question of guilt on the part of the rabbi and the young couple.
"I was listening to a Burt Bacherach song, The Look of Love, on the radio," he recalls.
The first volume of this bibliography documents all editions and variants in German from the earliest of Feuchtwanger's publications, including his dissertation Heinrich Heines Fragment: 'Der Rabbi von Bacherach'.
Krobb demonstrates its influence on Berthold Auerbach's early novels, on Heine's Der Rabbi von Bacherach, and on the novels of the forgotten Prague writer Salomon Kohn (1825-1904), especially his Gawriel.
Although the shtetl narrative undoubtedly now takes on an anti-modern, anti-bourgeois and anti-assimilationist stance, Isenberg distorts the picture somewhat by omitting any reference to important nineteenth-century precursors of the nostalgic tradition of ghetto writing, most notably Heine's Der Rabbi von Bacherach (1824-40), Aron Bernstein's Vogele der Maggid (1858) and Leopold Kompert's four collections of ghetto stories Aus dem Ghetto (1848), Neue Geschichten aus dem Ghetto (1860), Bohmische Juden (1851) and Geschichten einer Gasse (1865).