bacillus

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ba·cil·lus

 (bə-sĭl′əs)
n. pl. ba·cil·li (-sĭl′ī′)
1. Any of various bacteria, especially a rod-shaped bacterium.
2. Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, aerobic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that often occur in chains and include B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

[Late Latin, diminutive of Latin baculum, rod; see bak- in Indo-European roots.]

bacillus

(bəˈsɪləs)
n, pl -cilli (-ˈsɪlaɪ)
1. (Microbiology) any rod-shaped bacterium, such as a clostridium bacterium. Compare coccus2, spirillum1
2. (Microbiology) any of various rodlike spore-producing bacteria constituting the family Bacillaceae, esp of the genus Bacillus
[C19: from Latin: a small staff, from baculum walking stick]

ba•cil•lus

(bəˈsɪl əs)

n., pl. -cil•li (-ˈsɪl aɪ)
1. any rod-shaped or cylindrical bacterium of the genus Bacillus, comprising spore-producing bacteria.
2. (formerly) any bacterium.
[1880–85; < Late Latin, variant of Latin bacillum, diminutive of baculum staff, walking stick]

ba·cil·lus

(bə-sĭl′əs)
Plural bacilli (bə-sĭl′ī′)
Any of various bacteria that are shaped like a rod.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacillus - aerobic rod-shaped spore-producing bacteriumbacillus - aerobic rod-shaped spore-producing bacterium; often occurring in chainlike formations; found primarily in soil
anthrax bacillus, Bacillus anthracis - a species of bacillus that causes anthrax in humans and in animals (cattle and swine and sheep and rabbits and mice and guinea pigs); can be used a bioweapon
Bacillus globigii, Bacillus subtilis, grass bacillus, hay bacillus - a species of bacillus found in soil and decomposing organic matter; some strains produce antibiotics
Yersinia pestis - a bacillus bacterium that causes the plague; aerosolized bacteria can be used as a bioweapon
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Bacillus - type genus of the Bacillaceae; includes many saprophytes important in decay of organic matter and a number of parasites
Translations
basilli
bacilus

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] N (bacilli (pl)) [bəˈsɪlaɪ]bacilo m

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] nbacille m

bacillus

n pl <bacilli> → Bazillus m

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] n (bacilli (pl)) [bəˈsɪlaɪ]bacillo

ba·cil·lus

, bacilli
n. bacilo, microbio, bacteria en forma de bastoncillo;
Calmette-Guérin, bacille bilié ______ de Calmette Guérin, bacille bilié;
Koch's ___, Mycobacterium tuberculosis___ de Koch, micobacteria de la tuberculosis;
typhoid ___, Salmonella typhi___ de la fiebre tifoidea, Salmonela tifoidea.

bacillus

n (pl -li) bacilo
References in periodicals archive ?
From a sample taken by Calea on 25 June as part of Calea's routine monitoring designed to detect microbial contamination in the production area and on production personnel, bacteria of the type Bacillus cereus / thuringiensis / mycoides were recovered.
As part of the exciting Food Safety Week activities, each day at the hotel was celebrated as a Bacterium Day ranging from Salmonella Day, E.coli Day, Bacillus Cereus Day, Listeria Day and Staphylococcus Aureus Day.
Coli, Campylobacteria, Listeria, Norovirus, and the anerobic Bacillus cereus as the six most common viruses.
Dr Mohamud Verjee, WCM-Q associate professor of Family Medicine in Clinical Medicine, assistant dean, Medical Student Affairs, and a consultant Family Physician, identified Salmonella, E Coli, Campylobacteria, Listeria, Norovirus, and the anaerobic Bacillus cereus as the six most common pathogens.
Bacillus cereus causes foodborne illness that is characterized by vomiting because of production of emetic toxin and diarrhea because of production of enterotoxin (1).
Bacillus cereus can cause a gastrointestinal illness that includes vomiting or diarrhea.
An autopsy revealed he had died suddenly from food poisoning caused by a bacteria called bacillus cereus which is a spore forming bacteria that produces toxins, causing vomiting and diarrhea.
There are germs, including bacteria salmonella, botulinum, norwalk virus, bacillus cereus, sapovirus, astrovirus, compylobacter, chemicals, pesticides and other toxins and colouring agents.
Hartmann's team used that data to compare the strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus on the ISS to those on Earth.
The genotypic identification result designates that isolated bacteria are actually part of Bacillus cereus (1P11, 1P12, 1P14, 1P15, 2P20, 2P23), Virgibacillus salarius (1P18) and Bacillus toyonensis (2P22).

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