bacillus

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ba·cil·lus

 (bə-sĭl′əs)
n. pl. ba·cil·li (-sĭl′ī′)
1. Any of various bacteria, especially a rod-shaped bacterium.
2. Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, aerobic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that often occur in chains and include B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

[Late Latin, diminutive of Latin baculum, rod; see bak- in Indo-European roots.]

bacillus

(bəˈsɪləs)
n, pl -cilli (-ˈsɪlaɪ)
1. (Microbiology) any rod-shaped bacterium, such as a clostridium bacterium. Compare coccus2, spirillum1
2. (Microbiology) any of various rodlike spore-producing bacteria constituting the family Bacillaceae, esp of the genus Bacillus
[C19: from Latin: a small staff, from baculum walking stick]

ba•cil•lus

(bəˈsɪl əs)

n., pl. -cil•li (-ˈsɪl aɪ)
1. any rod-shaped or cylindrical bacterium of the genus Bacillus, comprising spore-producing bacteria.
2. (formerly) any bacterium.
[1880–85; < Late Latin, variant of Latin bacillum, diminutive of baculum staff, walking stick]

ba·cil·lus

(bə-sĭl′əs)
Plural bacilli (bə-sĭl′ī′)
Any of various bacteria that are shaped like a rod.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacillus - aerobic rod-shaped spore-producing bacteriumbacillus - aerobic rod-shaped spore-producing bacterium; often occurring in chainlike formations; found primarily in soil
anthrax bacillus, Bacillus anthracis - a species of bacillus that causes anthrax in humans and in animals (cattle and swine and sheep and rabbits and mice and guinea pigs); can be used a bioweapon
Bacillus globigii, Bacillus subtilis, grass bacillus, hay bacillus - a species of bacillus found in soil and decomposing organic matter; some strains produce antibiotics
Yersinia pestis - a bacillus bacterium that causes the plague; aerosolized bacteria can be used as a bioweapon
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Bacillus - type genus of the Bacillaceae; includes many saprophytes important in decay of organic matter and a number of parasites
Translations
basilli
bacilus

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] N (bacilli (pl)) [bəˈsɪlaɪ]bacilo m

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] nbacille m

bacillus

n pl <bacilli> → Bazillus m

bacillus

[bəˈsɪləs] n (bacilli (pl)) [bəˈsɪlaɪ]bacillo

ba·cil·lus

, bacilli
n. bacilo, microbio, bacteria en forma de bastoncillo;
Calmette-Guérin, bacille bilié ______ de Calmette Guérin, bacille bilié;
Koch's ___, Mycobacterium tuberculosis___ de Koch, micobacteria de la tuberculosis;
typhoid ___, Salmonella typhi___ de la fiebre tifoidea, Salmonela tifoidea.

bacillus

n (pl -li) bacilo
References in periodicals archive ?
Contaminated Ventilator Air Flow Sensor and Bacillus cereus Colonization of Newborns
The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department today (July 17) announced the results of a recently completed targeted food surveillance project on Bacillus cereus and Clostridium perfringens in ready-to-eat food.
The species isolated in this study also included Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sp.
The Microbial strains used in the sensitivity assay were Escherichia coli (MTCC 1687), Klebsiella pneumoniae (MTCC 432), Proteus mirabilis (MTCC 3310), Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC 737), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 424), Shigella sonnei (MTCC 646), Aeromonas hydrophila (MTCC 1739), Salmonella typhimurium (MTCC 733), Vibrio cholera (MTCC 3906), Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430) and Candida albicans (Diploid fungus) (MTCC 854) were purchased from MTCC, Chandigarh, India and they were sub cultured as per the guideline and standard protocol laid down by National committee for clinical Laboratory standards.
The effects of pre-inoculation of oil palm seedlings with either Trichoderma harzianum and/or Bacillus cereus on their vegetative growth and the suppression of Ganoderma boninense were investigated.
9 + + amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535T (AB255669) A2 Bacillus cereus 99.
For G+ bacteria, ZnO exhibits maximum activity (222) against Bacillus subtilis and minimum activity ((132) against Bacillus cereus bacteria.
Effects of temperature, pH, and controlled water activity on inactivation of spores of Bacillus cereus in paprika powder by near-IR radiation.
Moreover, the organism was found genetically closer to Bacillus cereus than to Bacillus mycoides and Bacillus thuringiensis with respect to 16S rRNA gene sequence.
Theoretically, he said, bacteria such as E coli and Bacillus Cereus can cause certain infections like blood stream and skin and soft tissue infections and food poisoning, but only if these bacteria are pathogenic and contracted in specific settings.

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