buyback

(redirected from Back Contracts)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

buy·back

 (bī′băk′)
n.
1. An act of buying something that one previously sold or owned.
2. The repurchase of stock by the company that issued it, as to reduce holdings of a single investor or increase the value of shares by reducing their number.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

buy•back

(ˈbaɪˌbæk)

n.
1. the buying of something that one previously sold.
2. any arrangement to take back something as a condition of a sale.
3. a repurchase by a company of its own stock.
[1960–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buyback - the act of purchasing back something previously sold
purchase - the acquisition of something for payment; "they closed the purchase with a handshake"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It warned that adult social care providers were handing back contracts due to unpaid fees and higher staffing costs with the national living wage.
One of the protestors, Mohammad Daud, said about 70 firms had signed some years back contracts with the ministry for logistic supplies to provincial police headquarters.
Copper is heading for quarterly and monthly declines, and some traders who bet on lower prices may buy back contracts in short-covering.
British manufacturers are starting to take back contracts placed with companies in low-cost countries in the Far East, preferring instead to do the work on home shores, research has found.
2, 2009 (CENS) -- Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd., currently the world's No.1 contract electronics manufacturer, has begun launching a large-scale price cut of its connectors for notebook computers in hope of wining back contracts defecting to competitors after it added notebook assembly to business coverage last year.