bacteriocin

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Related to Bacteriocins: bacteriophage

bac·te·ri·o·cin

 (băk-tîr′ē-ə-sĭn′)
n.
An antibacterial substance, such as colicin, that is produced by certain bacteria and kills or inhibits the growth of closely related species or other strains within the same species.

bacteriocin

(bækˈtɪərɪəˌsɪn)
n
any protein-based toxin given off by bacteria to prevent the growth of related bacteria nearby
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the growth of pathogenic bacteria has been demonstrated to be inhibited by bacteriocins, such as plantaricins NC8, 35d, W, A, and C, and plantacin B, produced by L.
Further work is needed to investigate nature these bacteriocins as well as to find their genetic basis.
Bacteriocins are in general cationic, amphipathic molecules as they contain an excess of lysyl and arginyl residues.
BACTERIOCINS OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AGAINST PATHOGENS IN CHEESE
salivarius M18 is an abundant producer of bacteria -suppressing weapons called bacteriocins.
Two possible mechanisms for the beneficial effects of lactic acid bacteria on gastrointestinal disturbances are: i) production of antimicrobial compounds such as lactic acid and bacteriocins, and ii) adherence to the mucosa and co-aggregation to form a barrier that prevents colonization by pathogens.
In microbiology, the antimicrobial peptides are a significant part of the insolence system of probiotic and they are referred to as bacteriocins [9].
Bacteriocins obtained from LAB are antagonistic to other bacteria, most commonly to Gram-positive group (Cleveland et al.
LAB extend the shelf-life and ensure the safety of food by producing lactic acid, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide, and bacteriocins.
Because LAB have ability to produce different antimicrobial and aroma compounds during the fermentation process such as, organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, bacteriocins and others [8], these bacteria or their metabolites are considered good natural preservatives instead of chemical preservatives [9].
This is due to competition for nutrients and the presence of inhibitors produced by the starter culture, including organic acids, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins (O'Sullivan et al.