bacteroides

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Related to Bacteroides forsythus: Peptostreptococcus micros, Tannerella
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Noun1.bacteroides - type genus of BacteroidaceaeBacteroides - type genus of Bacteroidaceae; genus of Gram-negative rodlike anaerobic bacteria producing no endospores and no pigment and living in the gut of man and animals
bacteria genus - a genus of bacteria
Bacteroidaceae, family Bacteroidaceae - family of bacteria living usually in the alimentary canal or on mucous surfaces of warm-blooded animals; sometimes associated with acute infective processes
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Translations

bacteroides

n. bacteroides, bacterias anaeróbicas, sin formación de esporas, con bastoncillos de gramnegativos, que constituyen la flora del tracto intestinal y se encuentran en menor cantidad en la cavidad respiratoria y la cavidad urinaria.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The red complex, which includes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia (formerly Bacteroides forsythus), encompasses the most important pathogens in adult periodontal disease.
There are many species related with oral infections recoded by different studies like Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides forsythus,, Actinobacillus actinomycetem-comitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis Eubacterium species, Fusobacterium nucleatum also Eikenella corrodens, and Peptostreptococcus micros.
The presence of Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis or Bacteroides forsythus is proved when the test strip turns blue.
van der Velden, "Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus and other putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with and without periodontal destruction," Journal of Clinical Periodontology, vol.
Humoral Immune Responses to S-layer-Like Proteins of Bacteroides forsythus. Clin Diagnost Laborate Immune, 10(3): 383-387.
In addition, current smokers have poor healing ability, which is associated with persistent subgingival infection with Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis following sub gingival scaling and root planning when compared with ex-smokers and non-smokers (35).