Odyssey

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Od·ys·sey

 (ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n.
The younger of the two surviving ancient Greek epic poems, traditionally ascribed to Homer but containing much orally transmitted material composed over several centuries, and concerning the adventures and ordeals of the Greek warrior Odysseus after the fall of Troy as he struggles to return home and reestablish himself as king of Ithaca.

od′ys·sey′an (-sē′ən) adj.

od·ys·sey

 (ŏd′ĭ-sē)
n. pl. od·ys·seys
1. An extended adventurous voyage or trip.
2. An intellectual or spiritual quest: an odyssey of discovery.

[After the Odyssey.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Odyssey

(ˈɒdɪsɪ)
n
1. (Poetry) a Greek epic poem, attributed to Homer, describing the ten-year homeward wanderings of Odysseus after the fall of Troy
2. (often not capital) any long eventful journey
Odyssean adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Od•ys•sey

(ˈɒd ə si)

n., pl. -seys.
1. (italics) an epic poem attributed to Homer, describing Odysseus's adventures in his ten-year attempt to return home to Ithaca after the Trojan War.
2. (often l.c.) any long journey, esp. when filled with adventure, hardships, etc.
Od`ys•se′an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Odyssey - a long wandering and eventful journeyodyssey - a long wandering and eventful journey
journey, journeying - the act of traveling from one place to another
2.Odyssey - a Greek epic poem (attributed to Homer) describing the journey of Odysseus after the fall of Troy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

odyssey

noun journey, tour, trip, passage, quest, trek, expedition, voyage, crusade, excursion, pilgrimage, jaunt, peregrination The march to Travnik was the final stretch of a three-week odyssey.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

Odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsɪ] N (Myth) → Odisea f
odyssey (fig) → odisea f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsi] nodyssée f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Odyssey

n (Myth, fig) → Odyssee f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

odyssey

[ˈɒdɪsɪ] nodissea
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Nor have there been wanting learned exegetists who have opined that the whale mentioned in the book of Jonah merely meant a life-preserver --an inflated bag of wind --which the endangered prophet swam to, and so was saved from a watery doom.
We are students of words: we are shut up in schools, and colleges, and recitation-rooms, for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and do not know a thing.
I hope what they produce is more than a bag of wind and platitudes.
Barr is a man who has played in a bagpipe band at the world championship level, and if there's a bright side to having a highly successful legal career, it's that he doesn't have the time anymore to torture anyone with his chanters and bag of wind.
It's just I wish either we lived a lot closer to the equator or they kicked a bag of wind around in the middle of the summer, when I wouldn't be risking hypothermia at least once a week.
Luxury And that kicking a bag of wind into an onion bag will deliver a level of admiration that will be the envy of every country on the planet.
Brian McFadden even spoke fondly of the inflatable crash pad awaiting him at the other side of the dreaded ski jump: "I love jumping on a big bag of wind."
In her opening introduction she witters on about her relevant qualifications in broadcasting, child psychology and generally being an opinionated boring bag of wind. Maybe the last one wasn't a qualification; I stopped listening after a while.
"When he blundered through the third last I thought maybe that was it and that a big bag of wind would empty out of him and he would fall in a heap.
Murnaghan the-ears trainee from Epsom not long out of uni, the city proved a bit of an eye-opener but helped toughen him up for The Smoke and the Bag of Wind.
"Iran has said for some time that they're self-sufficient, but that's a bag of wind," Mark Fitzpatrick, a former State Department nuclear proliferation specialist told TIME.