common metre

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Related to Ballad meter: ballad metre, common measure

common metre

n
(Poetry) a stanza form, used esp for hymns, consisting of four lines, two of eight syllables alternating with two of six
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1) Newman, in his response piece, Homeric Translation in Theory and Practice (1861), argued that the ballad meter "is essentially a noble metre, a popular metre, a metre of great capacity," and condemned Arnold's derision of "ballad-manner" by arguing that, if hymns could be written in the "Common Metre" that is "the prevalent balladmetre," then it is inaccurate of Arnold to assume that "whatever is in this metre must be [all] oil the same level.
In the poem, Pickard submits the Geordie dialect to modernist procedures of compression and objectification: the ballad meter is condensed to mostly two- and three-beat lines, with an emphasis on the heavy silences between them, while the phonetic particularity of the dialect is rendered as a series of minimal, selfsame signs ("hev gorra" for have got a, "av got" for I've got), not marked diacritically as aberrations from a linguistic norm.
Two very late poems in ballad meter, "My Mother" (1975) and "Instruction to Myself" (1989), suggest that Brooks, in the end, still had a use for "a poem that sounds like that, that just ripples on.
ballad stanza A verse stanza common in English ballads that consists of two lines in ballad meter, usually printed as a four-line stanza with a rhyme scheme of abcb, as in The Wife of Usher's Well, which begins:
The effect is also, mysteriously, coy--reminiscent of those ditties by highbrow yuckster Ogden Nash, which make fun of the ballad meter within the ballad.
A meter used in English ballads that is equivalent to ballad meter, though ballad meter is often less regular and more conversational than common meter.
They also sought to recast its roughness of form and feeling into more acceptable poetic forms-usually into short rhyming lines, most commonly in four beats known as ballad meter.
When each fourteener is written as two lines of eight and six syllables, it becomes the standard ballad meter, as in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
12) Ultimately, however, I would argue that the familiarity of ballad themes and stories, even when they have been modified, contributes to their potential to be consumed as--indeed perhaps willfully misread as-the traditional version; and the regularity of the form and ballad meter itself also facilitates and naturalizes such happy, habitual misreadings.
All 18 poems were written in the traditional ballad meter of eight-syllable lines.
The other key distinctions between a ballad and blank verse, of course, are rhyme versus its absence and divergent measures: in contrast to the decasyllabic line (albeit with variations) of blank verse, ballad meter features iambics in alternating lines of eight and six syllables.
More important than the allusion is Robinson's manipulation of one isolated element of Euripides chorus to form something entirely different, a line which does not diverge from a fixed iambic meter but rather approximates one of the most common English metrical forms, ballad meter.