ballad opera

(redirected from Ballad operas)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

ballad opera

n
(Classical Music) an opera consisting of popular tunes to which appropriate words have been set, interspersed with spoken dialogue
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The two actors and managers often presented Shakespearean plays and ballad operas such as The Beggar's Opera, written in 1728 by John Gay with music arranged by Johann Christoph Pepusch.
Yet other ballad operas from around this time, such as Charles Johnson's The Village Opera (1729), also have arias sung to the tune of All in the Downs', but print Leveridge's tune.
His brother Sir John Fielding would later go on to attack The Beggar's Opera as an encouragement to crime (Fiske 1973: 402), but he himself proceeded to embrace the genre it spawned with such gusto that he became the country's most prolific composer of ballad operas.
Kitty Clive, who starred in some of Fielding's ballad operas, had strong views on how best to interpret the script.
Shield, who composed songs, ballad operas and some string chamber music, would be commissioned to write music for royal occasions.
Scholars of English and literature, music, and law from Europe and North America explore his writings, including his ballad operas, poetry, political journalism, social pamphlets, and novels Joseph Andrews, Tom Jones, and Amelia.
Seventeenth century ballad operas took the idea of grand Italian opera but made them accessible to ordinary folk by setting the lyrics to popular broadsheet ballads, opera arias, church hymns and folk tunes of the day.
18) But ballad operas of this kind remained in the repertoire for a relatively short time, the most popular and long-lived being reduced to afterpieces for use at the end of the evening's entertainment.
He played all the great roles in ballad operas from Tile Beggar's Opera onwards and, later, commissioned more.
The fourth chapter surveys the staggering array of stage adaptations of Richardson's novel, including not only Henry Giffard's comedy Pamela (1741), the anonymous Pamela; or, Virtue Triumphant (1741), two ballad operas in 1742, Edward Moore's The Foundling (1748), Isaac Bickerstaff's comic opera The Maid of the Mill (1765), and Samuel Foote's puppet-show farce Piety in Pattens (1773), but also stage adaptations produced in France by Louis de Boissy, Nivelle de La Chaussee, and Voltaire--and in Italy by Carlo Goldoni.
From humble beginnings he became a noted violinist and a prolific composer of songs and ballad operas.
No mention is made of musical developments in the early 1800s, such as ballad operas performed along the east coast, opera in New Orleans, or Moravian music in Pennsylvania.