Ballardian

Ballardian

(ˌbælˈɑːdɪən)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of James Graham Ballard (1930–2009), the British novelist, or his works
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) resembling or suggestive of the conditions described in Ballard's novels and stories, esp dystopian modernity, bleak man-made landscapes, and the psychological effects of technological, social or environmental developments
References in periodicals archive ?
The Square turns a contemporary art museum into a city-state of bizarre, dysfunctional and Ballardian strangeness.
The topics are celebration of wounds: excess, the body, and symbolic exchange in Crash; becoming-grass: deterritorialization and reterritorialization in Concrete Island; escaping the subject: the Ballardian theme of abdication; the psychopath as saint: Cocaine Nights, Super-Cannes, and the politics of transgression after the end of history; and in pursuit of the 21st century: the revolutionary imagination and the spectacle of terrorism in Millenium People.
It is also possible to find Ballard's work cited in architectural discourse; for example, Sellars suggests "an interdisciplinary, specifically Ballardian approach" to "shake architecture out of its 'business as usual' mentality, forcing it to confront the global economic and environmental crises just over the horizon" (86).
Even the ordinary can become magical once it's re-oriented, and in Off the Map, he explores unmapped places, from a Ballardian excursion onto a traffic island in the interstices of a motorway system to North Korea's uninhabited city of Kijong-dong, built to lure defectors from its neighbour by showcasing the technological advancements achieved under Communism.
It isn't the development that David Brillembourg envisioned, but it isn't a Ballardian hellscape either.
Maitland is what later on came to be thought of as an emblematic Ballardian character.
Visually, it is doggedly unoriginal and uninteresting, with the exception perhaps of some touches in which Peirce's imagination suddenly takes flight; two Ballardian car-wreck moments for Carrie's chief enemies; a grisly collision with a steering wheel and a chilling facial emergence through the windscreen.
The single is inspired by the late, great JG Ballard's short story The Life And Death Of God, the band explaining: "We're living in the Ballardian nightmare and there's so much doom and gloom around - his song is our perspective of a hopeful and optimistic future.
Disch's 1965 novel The Genocides is definitely cast in the Ballardian mode, a positioning that drew the fire of critics opposed to the New Wave's ideological renovation of the field.
Ballardian speculative fiction in the 1960s and 1970s, ending up with the translation of the now famous simulation novelist Yoshio Aramaki's early surrealist masterpiece "Soft Clocks" (1971), loosely based upon not only Salvador Dali's paintings but on Puccini's proto-Orientalist opera Madama Butterfly as well.
Indeed, compulsive repetitiveness at every level of fictive composition is arguably the most distinctive characteristic of the Ballardian mega-text.
It may seem that in invoking this psychoanalytic theorization of the crypt, I am suggesting that Kindness offers a revelation of the "secret," the encrypted "primal scene" that motors the Ballardian oeuvre.