Ballardian

Ballardian

(ˌbælˈɑːdɪən)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of James Graham Ballard (1930–2009), the British novelist, or his works
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) resembling or suggestive of the conditions described in Ballard's novels and stories, esp dystopian modernity, bleak man-made landscapes, and the psychological effects of technological, social or environmental developments
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the past forty years, Pauline has used his wicked sense of humor, his considerable engineering skills, and his nose for what is known in the collective as obtanium (useful things gotten on the cheap or for free) to build his rough beasts and then orchestrate violently chaotic, Ballardian ballets mecaniques that pit the brutes against one another with sometimes genuinely terrifying results.
The Square turns a contemporary art museum into a city-state of bizarre, dysfunctional and Ballardian strangeness.
The topics are celebration of wounds: excess, the body, and symbolic exchange in Crash; becoming-grass: deterritorialization and reterritorialization in Concrete Island; escaping the subject: the Ballardian theme of abdication; the psychopath as saint: Cocaine Nights, Super-Cannes, and the politics of transgression after the end of history; and in pursuit of the 21st century: the revolutionary imagination and the spectacle of terrorism in Millenium People.
It is also possible to find Ballard's work cited in architectural discourse; for example, Sellars suggests "an interdisciplinary, specifically Ballardian approach" to "shake architecture out of its 'business as usual' mentality, forcing it to confront the global economic and environmental crises just over the horizon" (86).
The next section begins with a series of Ana Barrado's Ballardian photographs.
Even the ordinary can become magical once it's re-oriented, and in Off the Map, he explores unmapped places, from a Ballardian excursion onto a traffic island in the interstices of a motorway system to North Korea's uninhabited city of Kijong-dong, built to lure defectors from its neighbour by showcasing the technological advancements achieved under Communism.
It isn't the development that David Brillembourg envisioned, but it isn't a Ballardian hellscape either.
Maitland is what later on came to be thought of as an emblematic Ballardian character.
Visually, it is doggedly unoriginal and uninteresting, with the exception perhaps of some touches in which Peirce's imagination suddenly takes flight; two Ballardian car-wreck moments for Carrie's chief enemies; a grisly collision with a steering wheel and a chilling facial emergence through the windscreen.
The single is inspired by the late, great JG Ballard's short story The Life And Death Of God, the band explaining: "We're living in the Ballardian nightmare and there's so much doom and gloom around - his song is our perspective of a hopeful and optimistic future."
"Crimes of the Near Future: Baudrillard/Ballard." Ballardian. 2007.
"Ballardian" brings to mind a singularly dystopian depiction of modern life: a world of soulless high rise housing estates, brutal civic architecture and bewildering road networks (a lot like Birmingham in the 1960s, in fact).