balloon loan

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balloon loan

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) a loan in respect of which interest and capital are paid off in instalments at irregular intervals
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This includes defeased loans, fully amortizing loans, and balloon loans. The ratings reflect this sensitivity analysis.
It is also designed to include disclosures about unique loan products, such as adjustable rate mortgages, balloon loans and some of the more exotic loan products that have been developed over the years.
Current loan terms for Freddie Mac's SBL offering include a hybrid ARM with initial 5-, 7-, or 10-year fixed-rate periods or 5-, 7-, or 10year fixed-rate balloon loans, all with up to a 30-year amortization.
"For years, we have made balloon loans with 10-year amortization or a 5-year balloon," Marx said of Copiah Bank.
Also, the loan cannot include risky features--especially balloon loans.
Fewer laws are used for balloon loans because balloon payments represent a much smaller portion of loans originated.
"This option is meant to preserve access to credit for consumers located in rural or underserved areas where banks originate balloon loans to hedge against interest rate risk for loans held in portfolio," the Federal Reserve said in a press release.
Balloon loans guarantee a fixed rate for a pre-determined period of time, often five to seven years, based on amortization over a longer term, such as 15 years.
After the third year, depending on how the market reacts, the fixed-rate or balloon loans are generally better.
Balloon loans provide the borrower with a lower monthly payment and the ability to obtain a lower interest rate for the principal amount before completion of the loan period.
This system of so-called "Balloon loans", also operated by Marks and Spencer Financial Services and Alliance & Leicester, gets drivers into more expensive cars than they could otherwise afford.
This system of so-called 'Balloon loans', also operated by Marks & Spencer Financial Services and Alliance & Leicester, gets drivers into more expensive cars than they could otherwise afford.