balneotherapy


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bal·ne·o·ther·a·py

 (băl′nē-ō-thĕr′ə-pē)
n.
The therapeutic use of baths, especially in mineral-rich waters.

[Latin balneum, bath; see bagnio + therapy.]

balneotherapy

(ˌbælnɪəˈθɛrəpɪ)
n
(Complementary Medicine) the treatment of disease by bathing, esp to improve limb mobility in arthritic and neuromuscular disorders

balneotherapy

the treatment of illness or disease by bathing.
See also: Remedies, Water
Translations

balneotherapy

nBalneotherapie f, Behandlung mit Heilbädern und Badekuren
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References in periodicals archive ?
Balneotherapy in sea water or mineral springs was used to cure a range of ills from arthritis and rheumatism to sterility and obesity.
The InterCon is also home to Les Thermes du Mzaar, a 1,200-square meter spa offering balneotherapy, aromatheraphy, pressotherapy and much more.
Although there are many legends surrounding the springs, the oldest testimony that thermal water was used for balneotherapy are the two basins in Banjiste built in 1797 by Hadzi Mudzedin, the son of Numan Efendi, members of the old Oruci Zade family from Debar whose genealogy can be traced back to 1010.
Spa towns or spa resorts (including hot springs resorts) typically offer various health treatments, which are also known as balneotherapy. The belief in the curative powers of mineral waters goes back to prehistoric times.
"We have discussed health tourism and the Israeli officials have expressed their interest in the development of balneotherapy and rehabilitation facilities.
In addition to standard therapeutic modality in the treatment of psoriasis, we can also use non-therapeutic procedure, such as balneotherapy [30-33].
Other treatments approved by the panelists included acetaminophen, warm soaks in mineral-rich water (balneotherapy), topical capsaicin, walking canes, duloxetine (Cymbalta), and NSAIDs when comorbidities don't rule them out.
Balneotherapy is a traditional term to describe spa therapies that often include mud packs and hyperosmolar mineral bathing.
When it comes to clinical research on the benefits of balneotherapy, however, conclusions are mixed, sometimes even on the same page.
These days doctors are somewhat less likely to prescribe a restorative dip--although I noticed balneotherapy is listed on my health insurance coverage!