okra

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o·kra

 (ō′krə)
n.
1.
a. A tall tropical African annual plant (Abelmoschus esculentus) in the mallow family, widely cultivated in warm regions for its edible, mucilaginous green pods.
b. The edible pods of this plant, used in soups and stews and as a vegetable. Also called regionally gumbo.
2. See gumbo.

[Of West African origin; akin to Akan (Twi) nkruma.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

okra

(ˈəʊkrə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: ladies' fingers an annual malvaceous plant, Hibiscus esculentus, of the Old World tropics, with yellow-and-red flowers and edible oblong sticky green pods
2. (Plants) the pod of this plant, eaten in soups, stews, etc. See also gumbo1
[C18: of W African origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•kra

(ˈoʊ krə)

n., pl. o•kras.
1. a shrub, Abelmoschus esculentus, of the mallow family, bearing beaked pods.
2. the pods, eaten in soups, stews, etc.
Also called gumbo.
[1670–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.okra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plantokra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plant
Abelmoschus esculentus, Hibiscus esculentus, lady's-finger, okra plant, okra, gumbo - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
seedpod, pod - a several-seeded dehiscent fruit as e.g. of a leguminous plant
2.okra - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stewsokra - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
gumbo, okra - long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews
Abelmoschus, genus Abelmoschus - genus of tropical coarse herbs having large lobed leaves and often yellow flowers
okra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plant
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
3.okra - long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews
veg, vegetable, veggie - edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant
Abelmoschus esculentus, Hibiscus esculentus, lady's-finger, okra plant, okra, gumbo - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
okra
gombo
オクラ
mướp tây

okra

[ˈəʊkrə] Nkimbombó m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

okra

[ˈəʊkrə] ngombos mpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

okra

nOkra f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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