high place

(redirected from Bamot)

high place

n.
In early Semitic religions, a place of worship built usually on top of a hill.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

high place

n
(Judaism) Old Testament a place of idolatrous worship, esp a hilltop
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

high′ place`


n.
(in ancient Semitic religions) a place of worship, usu. a temple or altar on a hilltop.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the author of Kings admits that although he was righteous, he did tolerate the existence of bamot, the high places (II Kgs.
"The High Places (bamot) and the Reforms of Hezekiah and Josiah: An Archaeological Investigation." [Review] Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol.
Tom Stransky, an expert on ecumenical relations at Vatican II, and the Jewish Bamot Center for Social and Cultural Studies, represented by David Rosen.
65: 3b, refers to offering incense to YHWH at sacred groves but also, since such bamot are clearly associated with her, to Asherah as his consort.
(10.) Archaeological research from the Ancient Near East has revealed a structural similarity between the high places, or bamot, where the Goddess was worshipped, and unearthed funeral mounds where evidence suggests that people brought specific foodstuffs to offer to the dead.
Fried, "The High Places (bamot) and the Reforms of Hezekiah and Josiah: An Archaeological Investigation," JAOS 122 (2002): 437-65, esp.
The particular items examined are 'aserim (sacred trees), bamot (high places) massebot (standing stones), and mizbehot (altars).
THE BIBLICAL TEXT castigates the people of Israel and Judah repeatedly for going to bamot to sacrifice and burn incense rather than to the great temple in Jerusalem (1 Kings 3:2, 3; 22:44; 2 Kings 12:4; 14:4; 15:4, 35).
Lewis, "Ezekiel 43:7-9 (with an Excursus on Albright's bamot Hypothesis)," in Cults of the Dead in Ancient Israel and Ugarit (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1989), 139-42.