okra

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o·kra

 (ō′krə)
n.
1.
a. A tall tropical African annual plant (Abelmoschus esculentus) in the mallow family, widely cultivated in warm regions for its edible, mucilaginous green pods.
b. The edible pods of this plant, used in soups and stews and as a vegetable. Also called regionally gumbo.
2. See gumbo.

[Of West African origin; akin to Akan (Twi) nkruma.]

okra

(ˈəʊkrə)
n
1. (Plants) Also called: ladies' fingers an annual malvaceous plant, Hibiscus esculentus, of the Old World tropics, with yellow-and-red flowers and edible oblong sticky green pods
2. (Plants) the pod of this plant, eaten in soups, stews, etc. See also gumbo1
[C18: of W African origin]

o•kra

(ˈoʊ krə)

n., pl. o•kras.
1. a shrub, Abelmoschus esculentus, of the mallow family, bearing beaked pods.
2. the pods, eaten in soups, stews, etc.
Also called gumbo.
[1670–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.okra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plantokra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plant
Abelmoschus esculentus, Hibiscus esculentus, lady's-finger, okra plant, okra, gumbo - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
seedpod, pod - a several-seeded dehiscent fruit as e.g. of a leguminous plant
2.okra - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stewsokra - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
gumbo, okra - long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews
Abelmoschus, genus Abelmoschus - genus of tropical coarse herbs having large lobed leaves and often yellow flowers
okra - long green edible beaked pods of the okra plant
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
3.okra - long mucilaginous green pods; may be simmered or sauteed but used especially in soups and stews
veg, vegetable, veggie - edible seeds or roots or stems or leaves or bulbs or tubers or nonsweet fruits of any of numerous herbaceous plant
Abelmoschus esculentus, Hibiscus esculentus, lady's-finger, okra plant, okra, gumbo - tall coarse annual of Old World tropics widely cultivated in southern United States and West Indies for its long mucilaginous green pods used as basis for soups and stews; sometimes placed in genus Hibiscus
Translations
okra
gombo
オクラ
mướp tây

okra

[ˈəʊkrə] Nkimbombó m

okra

[ˈəʊkrə] ngombos mpl

okra

nOkra f
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that most Buddhist preachers in Burma never flinch from identifying Islam as their biggest enemy, its alleged crime of having exterminated Buddhism from India and the destruction of the Buddhas of Bamya.
Also available were steamed veggies, kibbeh, spring rolls, chicken biryani, bamya (an okra tomato-based saucy meat dish) and white rice.
The festival will mark its finale on April 27 with the announcement of the 2015 winners of its annual Altyn Bamya (Golden Okra) Awards, an ironic set of movie awards aimed at highlighting sexism in mainstream Turkish cinema.
There is genuine belief amongst officials that a globalised Palestine is a "normal" Palestine, as was echoed numerous times by Bamya himself throughout his address.
Saeb Bamya, a senior adviser to the now resigned PA minister of economy, said a WTO membership would allow Palestinians to "join the multilateral trading system.
The two-state solution is the main topic on the diplomatic agenda, and economic separation is the main recommendation of both Palestinian and Israeli economists who deal with a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict (see Arnon and Bamya, 2007; and The Peres Center and Paltrade, 2006).
Also, known as bamya, gumbo and ladies' fingers, it has been for hundreds of years a popular vegetable, especially in Africa, India and the Middle East.