Bank of Japan


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Noun1.Bank of Japan - the central bank of Japan
central bank - a government monetary authority that issues currency and regulates the supply of credit and holds the reserves of other banks and sells new issues of securities for the government
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Three, the Powell Fed will raise the Fed Funds rate at least four times in its anti-inflation vigilance while the Kuroda Bank of Japan continues to "nationalise" the government bond market, 98 per cent owned by domestic investors.
But last week the Bank of Japan said it was considering further cuts to the rate it charges banks for borrowing.
Bank of Japan to release monetary base for September.
The Bank of Japan is to begin a two-day meeting Monday.
Abe has urged the Bank of Japan - the country's central bank - to undertake unconventional steps for economic growth.
But while the recent Japanese announcement is clearly a step in the right direction, the Bank of Japan's experience illustrates the struggle that central banks can face in communicating an inflation objective in a deflationary environment.
The central bank of Japan has kept its interest rate close to zero.
The Bank of Japan eased its monetary policy further on Monday as share prices plunged and a nuclear emergency seized the country after Friday's devastating earthquake and tsunami in northeast Japan.
The major problem is that deflation prevents the Bank of Japan from using negative real interest rates (that is, interest rates below the rate of inflation) to stimulate demand.
The Bank of Japan maintained its view on the economy and reiterated that "Japan's economic conditions have stopped worsening." The central bank left the overnight interest rate unchanged during its policy meeting earlier this week, and Governor Masaaki Shirakawa expressed some doubts about a pickup in future demand despite the rebound in exports and production.
The government has proposed that Toshiro Muto, former administrative vice finance minister and incumbent deputy governor of the Bank of Japan, be promoted to governor.
On March 9, 2006, the Bank of Japan announced an end to its quantitative easing policy.