barbastelle

(redirected from Barbastelle Bat)
Related to Barbastelle Bat: Western Barbastelle

barbastelle

(ˌbɑːbəˈstɛl)
n
(Animals) an insectivorous forest bat, Barbastella barbastellus, widely distributed across Eurasia, having a wrinkled face and prominent ears: roosts in trees or caves
[French: from Italian barbastello, from Latin vespertilio bat; see pipistrelle]
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References in periodicals archive ?
The barbastelle bat Barbastella barbastellus (Schreber, 1774) is regarded as one of the most endangered bat species in Europe.
Animals such as the dormouse, the rare Barbastelle bat, skylark and the great crested newt all live in the West Midlands.
The barbastelle bat, which is considered rare and declining across Europe, is of particular interest.
Matt Zeale of the University of Bristol, who also found a barbastelle bat for the first time in the area, said he was "as surprised as you could be" to find the Bechstein's bat during the survey work at Colby.
There has also been a boost to wildlife, with species from Daubenton's and barbastelle bats to woodcocks and cuckoos spotted, and increases in frogspawn and aquatic insects.
Around the turn of the millennium, I discovered one of the largest colonies of barbastelle bats in the world.
The aim of the scheme is also to enhance the habitats in the local area for the benefit of barbastelle bats, which can be found in south Warwickshire, and to increase local and national awareness of the species.
Western barbastelle bats in Europe typically ping out echolocation calls softly enough to locate a moth for dinner before the moth hears the predators coming, says Holger Goerlitz of the University of Bristol in England.
Holger Goerlitz of the University of Bristol in England said that western barbastelle bats in Europe typically ping out their echolocation calls softly enough to locate a moth for dinner before the moth hears them coming.
Spatial and temporal patterns of roost use by tree-dwelling barbastelle bats Barbastella barbastellus.
As part of their "Living Landscapes" project, Wildlife Trusts are trying to link up natural areas of woodland, heathland and pasture to extend habitats for creatures such as pipistrelle and barbastelle bats, and sand lizards.