Barbiton

(redirected from Barbitos)

Bar´bi`ton


n.1.(Mus.) An ancient Greek instrument resembling a lyre.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Antiquity and the Middle Ages, poems were written in order to be performed to a broader public; they were typically sung and accompanied by string instruments (a lyre, cithara, or barbitos).
The barbitos, the ancient lyre, Since the Kaiser's day, is restrung with barbed wire Bard's hands bleed when they play The score that fits an era's scream, the blood, the suffering and the loss.
These instruments will include, of course, the lyre (chelys and barbitos types), the phorminx, the cithara, the sambuca and the bendir.
Greek stringed instruments included the Chelys Lyre, Kithara, Barbitos, Phorminx, Thracian Kithara, and Harp.
Sembre-rebbe infatti suggerire, ancorche non apertis verbis, la derivazione del vocabolo barbitos da 'barbaro'.
Pound's lament in 1920 as to how "The pianola 'replaces'/Sappho's barbitos" ("Hugh Selwyn Mauberley" lines 35-36).
flendus amor meus est; elegia flebile carmen; non facit ad lacrimas barbitos ulla meas.
Whereas his previous poems may have provided recreation, use of the Latinized Greek word "barbitos" (4), which is juxtaposed with the complement "Latinum ...
Another fragment (176), consisting entirely of three words, barbitos, baromos, barmos, offers a brief glimpse into what seems to be a poetic meditation on the low-pitched, long-armed lyre native to Lesbos.
After reading chapters of Ulysses (Joyce was a dangerous stimulus to Pound), the poet conflates, in poem I, Mauberley with the Greek wanderer: "His true Penelope was Flaubert/ He fished by obstinate isles." In poem III, modern vulgarity is simplistically set off against ancient beauty--the sort of thing Eliot is wrongly accused of doing in The Waste Land and elsewhere: "The piano `replaces'/Sappho's barbitos."