Barcelona

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Bar·ce·lo·na

 (bär′sə-lō′nə)
A city of northeast Spain on the Mediterranean Sea. Founded by the Carthaginians, it prospered under the Romans and Visigoths, fell to the Moors c. 713, and was taken by Charlemagne's Frankish troops in 801. It has long been a center of Catalan separatism and radical political movements.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Barcelona

(ˌbɑːsɪˈləʊnə)
n
(Placename) the chief port of Spain, on the NE Mediterranean coast: seat of the Republican government during the Civil War (1936–39); the commercial capital of Spain. Pop: 1 582 738 (2003 est). Ancient name: Barcino
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bar•ce•lo•na

(ˌbær səˈloʊ nə)

n.
a seaport in NE Spain, on the Mediterranean. 2,000,000.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Barcelona - a city in northeastern Spain on the MediterraneanBarcelona - a city in northeastern Spain on the Mediterranean; 2nd largest Spanish city and the largest port and commercial center; has been a center for radical political beliefs
Espana, Kingdom of Spain, Spain - a parliamentary monarchy in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; a former colonial power
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Барселона
Barselona

Barcelona

[ˌbɑːsəˈləʊnə] NBarcelona f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Barcelona

[ˌbɑːrsɪˈləʊnə] nBarcelonebar chart ndiagramme m en bâtonsbar code ncode m à barres
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Barcelona

[bɑːsɪˈləʊnə] nBarcellona
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
They, persuaded that it was grief at finding himself vanquished, and the object of his heart, the liberation and disenchantment of Dulcinea, unattained, that kept him in this state, strove by all the means in their power to cheer him up; the bachelor bidding him take heart and get up to begin his pastoral life, for which he himself, he said, had already composed an eclogue that would take the shine out of all Sannazaro had ever written, and had bought with his own money two famous dogs to guard the flock, one called Barcino and the other Butron, which a herdsman of Quintanar had sold him.
Barcino's Rockwell branch serves breakfast from 7 a.m.
Just purchase the official Drink O' de Mayo consumable stubs and help yourself to a variety of drinks, dishes and Cinco de Mayo specials from The Bowery, Fiery Style, Hacienda, Tipsy Pig, Salu, Big Bad Wolf, Sunrise Buckets, Reserve Gastro Tavern, Bugsy's, Rue Bourbon, Bondiand Bourke, L'entrecote, Barcino, UCC Clockwork, UCC Cafe Terrace, Mulberry Door, Southern Grind Bistro, Watering Hole, Tap Station, Bistro Madrid and Locavore.
(1991): "El templo romano de Barcino. Analisis de la decoracion arquitectonica", Cuadernos de Arquitectura Romana, 1, pp.
Sergei Rostoll, Dani Aliaga, and Uri Singla have been in the Philippines for 12 years now, building a pretty successful restaurant business, starting with Barcino, arguably the city's first successful wine bar concept (which they eventually sold), and then Rambla, Las Flores, and Tomatito--that took the traditional Spanish food beloved by Filipinos, and gave it a twist.
Vigo, Flora dels Paisos Catalans, IV Monocotiledonies, Editorial Barcino, Barcelona, Spain, 6th edition, 2001.