barefoot doctor

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barefoot doctor

n.
A lay health care worker, especially in rural China, trained to perform tasks such as providing first aid, assisting in childbirth, and dispensing drugs.

barefoot doctor

n
(Medicine) (esp in developing countries) a worker trained as a medical auxiliary in a rural area who dispenses medicine, gives first aid, assists at childbirth, etc
[C20: translation of Chinese chijiao yisheng, officially translated as primary health worker]

bare′foot doc′tor


n.
(in China) a layperson trained to provide a number of basic health-care services, esp. in rural areas.
[1965–70]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, barefoot doctors were farmers who worked without shoes in the rice paddies and treated villagers' basic ailments the best they could.
The nearest barefoot doctor was three miles away, in my eldest sister's village.
The negative effects of destroying medical education and shipping a third of the professors to the countryside to do farm labor were acknowledged, but there was generally favorable treatment of the barefoot doctors and the overall effect of Communism.
It is for this reason that OHO originally traded and was incorporated under the company name of 'The Barefoot Doctors Project'.
Riding on the international recognition of the success of the Barefoot Doctors model, the Chinese delegate to the WHO suggested an international conference to discuss the issue.
Barefoot doctors or super speciaists, cash-free healthcare or private providers charging fat fees, a focus on lifestyle diseases or malaria and TB, obesity or malnutrition, primary care or top-class medical tourism -- our health system is constantly confronting these contradictory choices.
China's Cooperative Medical System during the Cold War era ensured that even rural farmers had some access to healthcare, even if it came from barefoot doctors who were community experts in Western and traditional forms of medicine.
The barefoot doctor system would not survive the turbulent years of economic reform.
Jan and I accompanied Daniel and his family to visit our barefoot doctors in Putao in January 1998.
His name may come from the days of ancient China, when barefoot doctors travelled from village to village healing, but he is a modern man.
The barefoot doctors made sure study participants took their vitamins and noted when someone developed cancer or died, whatever the cause.
It showcases the barefoot doctors program, which trained over one million young people to treat the common ailments of residents of rural China in the 1960s and 1970s.