Bower-Barff process

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Bow´er-Barff´ proc`ess


1.(Metal.) A certain process for producing upon articles of iron or steel an adherent coating of the magnetic oxide of iron (which is not liable to corrosion by air, moisture, or ordinary acids). This is accomplished by producing, by oxidation at about 1600° F. in a closed space, a coating containing more or less of the ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and the subsequent change of this in a reduced atmosphere to the magnetic oxide (Fe2O4).
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barff said the classes, conducted by former racing champions, take place at Dubai Autodrome in Dubai and Yas Marina Circuit in Abu Dhabi.
Barff is one such play," says Shukla who has written screenplays for movies such as Satya, donned roles in blockbusters such as Slumdog Millionaire, Lage Raho Munnabhai and PK as well as written and directed many plays.
As a result Bell took the lead but had to drive defensively for the next 20 minutes as Barff was on his tail.
Rob Barff in the NFS Racing Lotus was best among the GTC entries, while Bob George took pole position for in UAE Sportscar qualifying session.
Twenty seconds after Bianca left the room for a barff, Pat was on the phone.
Answer: If you guessed c (Barff View) you are absolutely correct.
Williams and Barff (1830) give another description presenting a picture much like the situation of intensive multicrop house gardening that Lepofsky (1994:51) describes for the Society Islands.
12, (31) Rob Barff, England; Andy Britnell, England; Richard Stanton, England; Richard Sutherland, Los Gatos, Calif., GTS, Rollcentre Racing Mosler MT900R, 635.
WEST HARTLEPOOL: Barff, Hodgson, Kerr, Thompson, Thomas, Connolly, Tighe, Cholmondeley, Cullinane, Cook, Webb, Davies, Wright, Sawyer, Bennett.
Franchitti and co-driver Kelvin Blurt finished a second behind the TVR Tuscan of Martin Short and Rob Barff.
Major brand-name firms, particularly Nike, have been celebrated as exemplars of organizational dis-intermediation on a global scale (Quinn 1992; Donahgu and Barff 1990) while, at the same time, they have been pilloried for allegedly profiting from exploitation of third world labour.