Barnes


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Barnes

 (bärnz), Albert Coombs 1872-1951.
American physician and art collector noted for his development of a silver-protein compound formerly used as a local antiseptic and his large collection of postimpressionist art.

Barnes

(bɑːnz)
n
1. (Biography) Djuna. 1892–1982, US novelist, noted for Nightwood (1936)
2. (Biography) William. 1801–86, British poet, best known for Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect (1879)
References in classic literature ?
This consideration gave him no little uneasiness, till Betty, the elder sister, was so kind, some time afterwards, entirely to cure him by a hint, that one Will Barnes, and not himself, had been the first seducer of Molly; and that the little child, which he had hitherto so certainly concluded to be his own, might very probably have an equal title, at least, to claim Barnes for its father.
This Will Barnes was a country gallant, and had acquired as many trophies of this kind as any ensign or attorney's clerk in the kingdom.
"Barnes the blacksmith is the biggest and strongest man for forty miles round," said the clergyman sternly.
Barnes," he said, "whether you know anything about what has happened here.
'When we lived at Henley, Barnes's gander was stole by tinkers.' Mr Pancks courageously nodded his head and said, 'All right, ma'am.' But the effect of this mysterious communication upon Clennam was absolutely to frighten him.
The curate had recommended rooms in Barnes, and these Philip engaged by letter at fourteen shillings a week.
Little Tommy Barnes was asleep now, and when they waked him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to go home to his ma, and didn't want to be a robber any more.
Have also wired Canniff, Toucey, and Barnes. - Sign, Cheyne."
Now, Boston and Albany, Barnes, same instructions from Albany through to Boston.
I shall have no difficulty, I suppose, in finding the house; though Fairfax, I believe, is not the proper nameI should rather say Barnes, or Bates.
"Well, I'm later too, for I got into talk, after meeting, with John Barnes, who has lately professed himself in a state of perfection, and I'd a question to ask him about his experience.
Barnes in the pantomime, in the second place, it sneezed; in the third, it sat upon end; in the fourth, it shook its fist in Doctor Ponnonner's face; in the fifth, turning to Messieurs Gliddon and Buckingham, it addressed them, in very capital Egyptian, thus: