Barnet


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Barnet

(ˈbɑːnɪt)
n
(Placename) a borough of N Greater London: scene of a Yorkist victory (1471) in the Wars of the Roses. Pop: 324 400 (2003 est). Area: 89 sq km (34 sq miles)

barnet

(ˈbɑːnɪt) or

barnet fair

n
(Anatomy) slang Brit hair
[C19: from rhyming slang Barnet Fair hair]

Bar•net

(ˈbɑr nɪt)

n.
a borough of Greater London, England. 305,900.
References in classic literature ?
He saw few fugitives until, in a grass lane towards High Barnet, he hap- pened upon two ladies who became his fellow travellers.
That was the story they told my brother in fragments when presently they stopped again, nearer to New Barnet. He promised to stay with them, at least until they could deter- mine what to do, or until the missing man arrived, and pro- fessed to be an expert shot with the revolver--a weapon strange to him--in order to give them confidence.
There were several carriers used the inn, and the stage-coaches for Barnet, for Totteridge, and other towns that way stood always in the street in the evening, when they prepared to set out, so that I was ready for anything that offered, for either one or other.
It happened very oddly that I was standing at the inn gate, and a woman that had stood there before, and which was the porter's wife belonging to the Barnet stage-coach, having observed me, asked if I waited for any of the coaches.
They were got about two miles beyond Barnet, and it was now the dusk of the evening, when a genteel-looking man, but upon a very shabby horse, rode up to Jones, and asked him whether he was going to London; to which Jones answered in the affirmative.
Early on the seventh morning after he had left his native place, Oliver limped slowly into the little town of Barnet. The window-shutters were closed; the street was empty; not a soul had awakened to the business of the day.
He had been crouching on the step for some time: wondering at the great number of public-houses (every other house in Barnet was a tavern, large or small), gazing listlessly at the coaches as they passed through, and thinking how strange it seemed that they could do, with ease, in a few hours, what it had taken him a whole week of courage and determination beyond his years to accomplish: when he was roused by observing that a boy, who had passed him carelessly some minutes before, had returned, and was now surveying him most earnestly from the opposite side of the way.
He encamped at Barnet, that is to say, within four leagues of the capital, cherished by the parliament, which thought it beheld in him a protector, and awaited by the people, who were anxious to see him reveal himself, that they might judge him.
The great round moon was floating breathlessly up in the eastern sky when they saw before them the twinkling lights of Barnet Town, some ten or twelve miles from London.
Not long after this, a score or more of the King's men came clattering up to the door of the inn at Barnet Town.
came on into Hertfordshire, anxiously renewing them at all the turnpikes, and at the inns in Barnet and Hatfield, but without any success-- no such people had been seen to pass through.
At Barnet there were other horses waiting for us, but as they had only just been fed, we had to wait for them too, and got a long fresh walk over a common and an old battle- field before the carriage came up.