baronet

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bar·on·et

 (băr′ə-nĭt, băr′ə-nĕt′)
n.
1. A man holding a British hereditary title of honor reserved for commoners, ranking immediately below the barons and above all orders of knighthood except the Garter.
2. Used as the title for such a man.

[Middle English, diminutive of baron, baron; see baron.]

baronet

(ˈbærənɪt; -ˌnɛt)
n
(Heraldry) (in Britain) a commoner who holds the lowest hereditary title of honour, ranking below a baron. Abbreviation: Bart. or Bt
[C15: order instituted 1611, from baron + -et]

bar•on•et

(ˈbær ə nɪt, ˌbær əˈnɛt)

n.
a member of a British hereditary order of honor, ranking below the barons and made up of commoners, designated by Sir before the name, and Baronet, usu. abbreviated Bart., after: Sir John Smith, Bart.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baronet - a member of the British order of honor; ranks below a baron but above a knight; "since he was a baronet he had to be addressed as Sir Henry Jones, Bart."
aristocrat, blue blood, patrician - a member of the aristocracy
Translations
baronetti

baronet

[ˈbærənɪt] Nbaronet m

baronet

[ˈbærənɛt ˈbærənət] (British) n (= nobleman) → baronnet m

baronet

nBaronet m

baronet

[ˈbærənɪt] nbaronetto
References in classic literature ?
Tinker, flinging down the coin; it's only baronets as cares about farthings."
Among the most respected of the names beginning in C which the Court-Guide contained, in the year 18--, was that of Crawley, Sir Pitt, Baronet, Great Gaunt Street, and Queen's Crawley, Hants.
He must have gained Sir Jervis Redwood's favor and confidence--and he might even have been a guest at the baronet's country seat--when Cecilia's letter arrived.
She would once more have treated the baronet's communication with contempt--but for the discovery that it contained an offer of employment in London, addressed to herself.
I had an interview with the baronet in his study after breakfast, and I told him all that I had seen.
The baronet has been in communication with the architect who prepared the plans for Sir Charles, and with a contractor from London, so that we may expect great changes to begin here soon.
Why, the gayest feather in Miss Monflathers's cap, and the brightest glory of Miss Monflathers's school, was a baronet's daughter--the real live daughter of a real live baronet--who, by some extraordinary reversal of the Laws of Nature, was not only plain in features but dull in intellect, while the poor apprentice had both a ready wit, and a handsome face and figure.
Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family, in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire; how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in three successive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II, with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome duodecimo pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--"Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset," and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--
'Oh no, indeed, I don't see very far into things, Sir Mulberry,' replied Mrs Nickleby, in a tone of voice which left the baronet to infer that she saw very far indeed.
Yes; I had told her so, either before or after that strange question of hers, when she had asked me so distrustfully if I knew many men of the rank of Baronet. Either before or after--my mind was not calm enough, then, to remember which.
Sir Leicester Dedlock is only a baronet, but there is no mightier baronet than he.
But he himself was in a little room adjoining, at work with his turning apparatus, and he called to the baronet to join him there.