baroreceptor

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bar·o·re·cep·tor

 (băr′ə-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory nerve ending that is stimulated by changes in pressure, especially one in the walls of blood vessels such as the carotid sinus.

baroreceptor

(ˈbærəʊrɪˌsɛptə) or

baroceptor

n
(Physiology) a collection of sensory nerve endings, principally in the carotid sinuses and the aortic arch, that monitor blood pressure changes in the body

bar•o•re•cep•tor

(ˌbær oʊ rɪˈsɛp tər)

n.
a nerve ending that responds to changes in pressure.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baroreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to pressure
sense organ, sensory receptor, receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
Translations

bar·o·re·cep·tor

n. barorreceptor, terminación nerviosa sensorial que reacciona a los cambios de presión.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baroreceptors located primarily in the carotid arteries and aorta, are highly sensitive to changes in BP.
Many ongoing researches have shown correlation between chronic pains and cardiovascular changes which are supposed to be mediated by baroreceptors.
Increased levels of stress before bathing, voice of water reflecting lights, and induction of pulmonary baroreceptors due to submersion into water were implicated in the pathogenesis of BRE, but no controlled study has been performed because of the paucity of cases (1).
20), the increase in venous return after water immersion stimulates the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors that can lead to a decrease in sympathetic tone and systemic vascular resistance.
Baroreceptors are receptors located in the carotid artery that sense blood pressure and relay that information to the brain.
Through the signaling of kidney baroreceptors located in the afferent arterioles, juxtaglomerular apparatus cells increase or reduce the renin secretion in response to decreased or increased circulating blood volume or renal blood flow, respectively.
An increase in levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these neural components of the baroreflex arc including the carotid and aortic baroreceptors [20-23], NTS [24-26], PVN [27], and RVLM [28-30] are seen in conditions such as diabetes, sleep apnea, hypertension, and heart failure.
Denervation of baroreceptors leads to an inability of the receptors to alter systemic BP in response to various physiological stimuli; hence, hypertension following CEA coupled with baroreceptor reflex breakdown can result in cerebral hyperperfusion.
This decrease in the systemic vascular resistance causes reflex increase in the sympathetic activity, which is mediated by the baroreceptors present in the carotid sinus and aortic arch, thereby causing an increase in the heart rate.
Negative intrathoracic pressure during mechanical ventilation can change the amount of increase in blood volume and the response of baroreceptors.
Baroreceptors located in the aorta and internal carotid artery sense the pressure within the vascular system (Adams et al.
At the same time, baroreceptors induce a slow sympathetic withdrawal from the vessels.