basalt

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ba·salt

 (bə-sôlt′, bā′sôlt′)
n.
1. A hard, dense, dark igneous rock composed chiefly of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxene, and olivine, and often having a glassy appearance.
2. A kind of hard unglazed pottery.

[From New Latin basaltēn, a misreading (in manuscripts of Pliny) of Latin basanītēn, accusative of basanītēs, a word Pliny uses of several kinds of rock, including a hard ironlike rock that the Egyptians obtained in Ethiopia, from Greek basanītēs (lithos), touchstone : basanos, touchstone (ultimately (perhaps via Lydian) from Egyptian bḫn, graywacke) + -ītēs, adjectival suffix.]

ba·sal′tic (-sôl′tĭk) adj.

basalt

(ˈbæsɔːlt)
n
1. (Geological Science) a fine-grained dark basic igneous rock consisting of plagioclase feldspar, a pyroxene, and olivine: the most common volcanic rock and usually extrusive. See flood basalt
2. (Ceramics) a form of black unglazed pottery resembling basalt
[C18: from Late Latin basaltēs, variant of basanītēs, from Greek basanitēs touchstone, from basanos, of Egyptian origin]
baˈsaltic adj

ba•salt

(bəˈsɔlt, ˈbæs ɔlt, ˈbeɪ sɔlt)

n.
the dark, dense, igneous rock of a lava flow or minor intrusion, composed essentially of labradorite and pyroxene and often displaying a columnar structure.
[1595–1605; < Latin basaltēs < Greek basanitēs=básan(os) touchstone (ultimately < Egyptian bhn(w) graywacke) + -ītēs -ite1]
ba•sal′tic, ba•sal′tine (-tɪn, -taɪn) adj.

ba·salt

(bə-sôlt′, bā′sôlt′)
A dark, fine-grained, igneous rock consisting mostly of feldspar, iron, and magnesium. Basalt makes up most of the ocean floor. It commonly forms when volcanic lava becomes solid. See Table at rock.

basalt

A fine-grained extrusive rock. Oceanic crust is largely basalt.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basalt - the commonest type of solidified lavabasalt - the commonest type of solidified lava; a dense dark grey fine-grained igneous rock that is composed chiefly of plagioclase feldspar and pyroxene
pyroxene - any of a group of crystalline silicate mineral common in igneous and metamorphic rocks
oligoclase, plagioclase - any of a series of triclinic feldspars that form rocks
volcanic rock - extrusive igneous rock solidified near or on the surface of the Earth
Translations
البازلت
čedič
basalt
bazalt
basalt
bazaltas
bazalts
čadič
bazaltyanık taş

basalt

[ˈbæsɔːlt] Nbasalto m

basalt

[ˈbæsɔːlt] n (= rock) → basalte m

basalt

nBasalt m

basalt

[ˈbæsɔːlt] nbasalto

basalt

(ˈbӕsoːlt) noun
any of certain types of dark-coloured rock.
References in classic literature ?
At Callyan they reached the junction of the branch line which descends towards south-eastern India by Kandallah and Pounah; and, passing Pauwell, they entered the defiles of the mountains, with their basalt bases, and their summits crowned with thick and verdant forests.
I tried to speak, but Captain Nemo stopped me by a gesture, and, picking up a piece of chalk-stone, advanced to a rock of black basalt, and traced the one word:
They fought in the breakers, they fought in the sand, and they fought on the smooth-worn basalt rocks of the nurseries, for they were just as stupid and unaccommodating as men.
It rests on ancient volcanic rocks, and has been covered by a stream of basalt, which must have entered the sea when the white shelly bed was lying at the bottom.
Clustering behind him we saw in the yellow field of light a wall of broken basalt which extended to the ceiling.
years, been made evidence of "Earth basalts often contain features that have been interpreted as being the result of tunnelling microbial activity.
These soils have been suggested to have generally developed from Schists of Dharwarian formation, Basalts of Deccan trap formation and Limestone of Bhima formation.
The basalts the rover examined are a new type, chemically different from those retrieved by the Apollo and Luna missions 40 years ago.
The final paper discusses the role of basalt stratigraphy and structure in understanding the hydrogeology of the basalts.
The basalts analyzed in the study all came from the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), a series of huge eruptions known to have started around 200 million years ago, when nearly all land was massed into one huge continent.
The petrography and geochemistry of these basalts are described in the section follows.
The north-western Duirinish, Waternish and Trotternish peninsulas are composed of Jurassic sediments covered by plateau basalts which erupted from dikes and fissures during the earliest Tertiary time, c.