baste

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baste 1

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
To sew loosely with large running stitches so as to hold together temporarily.

[Middle English basten, from Old French bastir, of Germanic origin.]

bast′er n.

baste 2

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
To moisten (meat, for example) periodically with a liquid, such as melted butter or a sauce, especially while cooking.

[Middle English basten.]

bast′er n.

baste 3

 (bāst)
tr.v. bast·ed, bast·ing, bastes
1. To beat vigorously; thrash: basted the attacker with a club.
2. To scold; berate.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse beysta; see bhau- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(Knitting & Sewing) (tr) to sew with loose temporary stitches
[C14: from Old French bastir to build, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German besten to sew with bast]

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(Cookery) to moisten (meat) during cooking with hot fat and the juices produced
[C15: of uncertain origin]

baste

(beɪst)
vb
(tr) to beat thoroughly; thrash
[C16: probably from Old Norse beysta]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

baste1

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
to sew with long, loose stitches, as in temporarily joining parts of a garment while it is being made.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French bastir to build, baste < Germanic; compare Old High German bestan to mend, patch, for *bastian, derivative of bast bast]
bast′er, n.

baste2

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
to moisten (meat or other food) with drippings, butter, etc., while cooking.
[1425–75]
bast′er, n.

baste3

(beɪst)

v.t. bast•ed, bast•ing.
1. to beat with a stick; thrash; cudgel.
2. to denounce or scold vigorously.
[1525–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

baste


Past participle: basted
Gerund: basting

Imperative
baste
baste
Present
I baste
you baste
he/she/it bastes
we baste
you baste
they baste
Preterite
I basted
you basted
he/she/it basted
we basted
you basted
they basted
Present Continuous
I am basting
you are basting
he/she/it is basting
we are basting
you are basting
they are basting
Present Perfect
I have basted
you have basted
he/she/it has basted
we have basted
you have basted
they have basted
Past Continuous
I was basting
you were basting
he/she/it was basting
we were basting
you were basting
they were basting
Past Perfect
I had basted
you had basted
he/she/it had basted
we had basted
you had basted
they had basted
Future
I will baste
you will baste
he/she/it will baste
we will baste
you will baste
they will baste
Future Perfect
I will have basted
you will have basted
he/she/it will have basted
we will have basted
you will have basted
they will have basted
Future Continuous
I will be basting
you will be basting
he/she/it will be basting
we will be basting
you will be basting
they will be basting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been basting
you have been basting
he/she/it has been basting
we have been basting
you have been basting
they have been basting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been basting
you will have been basting
he/she/it will have been basting
we will have been basting
you will have been basting
they will have been basting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been basting
you had been basting
he/she/it had been basting
we had been basting
you had been basting
they had been basting
Conditional
I would baste
you would baste
he/she/it would baste
we would baste
you would baste
they would baste
Past Conditional
I would have basted
you would have basted
he/she/it would have basted
we would have basted
you would have basted
they would have basted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

baste


click for a larger image
To moisten food with the fatty liquid in which it is cooking.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baste - a loose temporary sewing stitch to hold layers of fabric togetherbaste - a loose temporary sewing stitch to hold layers of fabric together
embroidery stitch, sewing stitch - a stitch made with thread and a threaded sewing needle through fabric or leather
Verb1.baste - cover with liquid before cookingbaste - cover with liquid before cooking; "baste a roast"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
moisten, dampen, wash - make moist; "The dew moistened the meadows"
2.baste - strike violently and repeatedlybaste - strike violently and repeatedly; "She clobbered the man who tried to attack her"
beat up, work over, beat - give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression; "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"; "The teacher used to beat the students"
3.baste - sew together loosely, with large stitchesbaste - sew together loosely, with large stitches; "baste a hem"
sew, sew together, stitch, run up - fasten by sewing; do needlework
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

baste

verb
To hit heavily and repeatedly with violent blows:
Informal: lambaste.
Slang: clobber.
Idiom: rain blows on.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

baste

[beɪst] VT
1. (Culin) → pringar
2. (Sew) → hilvanar
3. (= beat) → dar una paliza a
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

baste

[ˈbeɪst] vt
[+ meat] → arroser
(= tack) → bâtir, faufiler
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

baste

1
vt (Sew) → heften

baste

2
vt (Cook) → (mit Fett) beträufeln or begießen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

baste

[beɪst] vt (Culin) → ungere, inumidire col suo sugo (Sewing) → imbastire
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Do you know how many turkey basters I've gotten as gifts since that scene?" she said while laughing.
As boys we used to make "basters" - old newspapers rolled into a ball, tied with a long length of string and swung like a conker.
Examples might include special displays of turkey basters or potato mashers at Thanksgiving, or avocado pitters or peelers before Cinco de Mayo.
As the cast was made up of cutters, basters and sewing machine operators, participants could rehearse only at night and on weekends, and initial performances were presented only on Friday and Saturday nights.
The only way that he could have impregnated a girl was if he had borrowed one of Martha Stewart's old turkey basters.'"
Strangest posting: Either the one about why lesbians should keep an ice cream scoop next to their turkey basters or my April Fools' joke that Mary Cheney was going to guest-star on The L Word.
Other products on display include Orka Pod Hooks, the Orka Wall Scale, new aprons, roll-up baking sheets, and silicone basters and chopsticks.
Could Mary and Caitlin and their turkey basters pose a greater challenge to America than the world's dwindling supply of fossil fuel?