Basutoland


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Ba·su·to·land

 (bə-so͞o′tō-lănd′)
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Basutoland

(bəˈsuːtəʊˌlænd)
n
(Placename) the former name (until 1966) of Lesotho
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Le•so•tho

(ləˈsu tu, -ˈsoʊ toʊ)

n.
a monarchy in S Africa: formerly a British protectorate; gained independence 1966; member of the Commonwealth of Nations. 2,128,950; 11,716 sq. mi. (30,344 sq. km). Cap.: Maseru.Formerly, Basutoland.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Basutoland - a landlocked constitutional monarchy in southern AfricaBasutoland - a landlocked constitutional monarchy in southern Africa; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1966
capital of Lesotho, Maseru - the capital of Lesotho; located in northwestern Lesotho
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Basotho - a member of a subgroup of people who inhabit Lesotho
Sotho - a member of the Bantu people who inhabit Botswana, Lesotho, and northern South Africa and who speak the Sotho languages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Basutoland

[bəˈsuːtəʊlænd] N (formerly) → Basutolandia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the $3.6bn Phase 1 of a project executed across two former British colonies: Lesotho (formerly Basutoland) and South Africa.
NOW THEN (A) BANGLADESH (1) ABYSSINIA (B) BELIZE (2) BASUTOLAND (C) BENIN (3) BECHUANALAND (D) BOTSWANA (4) BESSARABIA (E) BURKINAFASO (5) BRITISH HONDURAS (F) CAMBODIA (6) BURMA (G) DJIBOUTI (7) CEYLON (H) ETHIOPIA (8) DAHOMEY (I) GHANA (9) DUTCH GUIANA (J) IRAN (10) EAST PAKISTAN (K) IRAQ (11) ELLICE ISLANDS (L) LESOTHO (12) FRENCH SOMALILAND (M) MALAWI (13) GOLD COAST (N) MALI (14) KAMPUCHEA (O) MOLDOVA (15) MESOPOTAMIA (P) MYANMAR (16) NEW HEBRIDES (Q) NAMIBIA (17) NORTHERN RHODESIA (R) SRILANKA (18) NYASALAND (S) SURINAME (19) PERSIA (T) THAILAND (20) SIAM (U) TUVALU (21) SOUTHERN RUSIA (V) VANUATU (22) SOUTHWEST AFRICA (W) ZAMBIA (23) SUDANESE REPUBLIC (X) ZIMBABWE (24) UPPER VOLTA NOW AND THEN--Answers
Sobukwe's grandfather left Lesotho (then known as Basutoland) to resettle in South Africa around the time of the Anglo-Boer War of 1899 - 1902.
What was de jure illegal may have been socially licensed (take, for instance, Hobsbawm's (2000 [1969]) 'social bandits'), and what was legal may have been illicit in some contexts: for example, the tensions between colonial law and chiefly institutions in nineteenth-century Basutoland (Burman 1981: 37).
The incident provoked new protests against discrimination in the USSR." (46) And in May 1962, according to another Komsomol report, "hooligans beat two Basutoland students, an event that provoked the sharp deterioration of relations between foreign and our students." (47)
In 1903, the Basutoland (169) National Council convened to "compile the Basotho traditional laws and reconcile them with the 'laws of Moshoeshoe."' (170) This process resulted in the creation of the Laws of Lerotholi, a codification of customary Lesotho laws concerning topics ranging from Khotla procedure to marriage law to theft.
In Africa, the former British colony of Basutoland is now known as what?
The following year 'Basutoland' was given over by Britain to the Cape Colony for administrative purposes.
Charles Noble Arden-Clarke, who had been the Resident Commissioner in Basutoland from 1942, was Governor of Sarawak from 29 October 1946 to 26 July 1949.