Batavian

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Batavian

(bəˈteɪvɪən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Batavia (a former name for Holland or Jakarta) or its inhabitants
n
1. (Placename) a native or inhabitant of Batavia
2. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Batavia
References in classic literature ?
In the first place, the black tulip had been produced; secondly, the Prince William of Orange, as a true Hollander, had promised to be present at the ceremony of its inauguration; and, thirdly, it was a point of honour with the States to show to the French, at the conclusion of such a disastrous war as that of 1672, that the flooring of the Batavian Republic was solid enough for its people to dance on it, with the accompaniment of the cannon of their fleets.
Under the mild protection of the Batavian Government, they enjoyed already that freedom of religious worship, for which they had resigned so many comforts and enjoyments at home; but their hearts panted for a restoration to the bosom of their country.
Will people remember that in addition to winning state championships, Batavians filled the stands in support of the teams?
Three altars to Mithras were found in the temple, dedicated by the First Cohort of Batavians from Holland and the Rhineland, who were one of the units which garrisoned the fort.
Approximately 2,000 years ago, the black Batavians and white Friesians cows were bred to produce better breed.
And why not hang the picture of the sampling officials of the Amsterdam drapers' guild, known as The Syndics, 1662, in the same room as The Conspiracy of the Batavians Under Claudius Civilis, ca.
The National Gallery have achieved a coup by borrowing The Conspiracy of the Batavians under Claudius Civilis (c.
Billie Owens, like her spouse a former Southern California reporter, is The Batavians editor, resident grammarian, and writer of such deadpan police-scanner entries as "Pantless man making snow angels on South Main Street" and "Boyfriend allegedly takes pregnant girlfriend's pack of smokes.
The western portion was inhabited by the Batavians and became part of a Roman province; the eastern portion was inhabited by the Frisians.
But a far more diverse society actually emerged in the islands, by the beginning of the eighteenth century, its 'chief inhabitants or burghers' were listed as comprising Europeans, Batavians, Ambonese, Ternatens and Chinese, in addition to regular in-migrants including Tanimbarese, Balinese, Butonese and Buginese, and 'many emancipated slaves'.
The influence of Tacitus is considered as well as how terms such as Germania, Belgae, and Batavians acquired significance.
2004): Ethnic Identity and Imperial Power: The Batavians in the early Roman Empire.