batterer


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batterer

(ˈbætərə)
n
a. a person who batters someone
b. (in combination): baby-batterer; wife-batterer.
Translations

batterer

[ˈbætərəʳ] N persona que maltrata físicamente a su mujer o marido e hijos
wife-batterermarido m violento

batterer

n wife-battererprügelnder Ehemann; child-battererprügelnder Vater, prügelnde Mutter; treatment programmes for batterersBehandlungsprogramme für prügelnde Ehepartner und Eltern
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: "Emotionally Intelligent Batterer Intervention: Acceptance-Based, Cognitive Behavioral Domestic Violence Group Treatment Manual" by licensed marriage and family therapist Wendy W.
A torture law would equally capture the terror of a drug kingpin exacting information, a kidnapper with a basement of horrors, and a domestic violence batterer.
Batterer intervention programs aim to teach offenders better ways of dealing with anger and relationships.
As the relationship progresses, a skilled batterer will introduce new, more drastic tactics.
So why does everyone hate the 40-year-old health food lover even more than bad boy Rihanna batterer Chris Brown?
8) These courts--although they take slightly different forms in each of the jurisdictions in which they are implemented--are typically defined by a docket dedicated solely to domestic violence-related matters, court personnel trained in intimate panner violence, and close ties to community organizations that offer, among other things, batterer intervention programs and victim support.
Since most domestic violence occurs in the context of an argument, the experiment I conducted evaluated whether I could change how the communication goes during an argument with the batterer and his partner.
The batterer as parent; addressing the impact of domestic violence on family dynamics, 2d ed.
Batterer intervention programmes for men have evolved into the most prominent and visible form of intervention aimed at ending intimate partner violence.
27) The court orders batterers to have no contact with the victim in these Injunctions, and can also order other protections and assistance for the children and victim, including batterer intervention programs, child support, and supervised visitation.
Because our focus is on the male batterer in heterosexual relationships, we use female referents for the victim and male for the batterer.
For example, some jurisdictions require that the victim prove she suffered physical injuries as a result of abuse, the act is recent, weapons were used in the commission of the act, the act was part of a continuing course of conduct, or that the batterer was convicted of an enumerated offense.