Flodden

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Flod·den

 (flŏd′n)
A hill of northern England near the Scottish border. It was the site of the Battle of Flodden Field (September 9, 1513) in which the English defeated the Scots under James IV, who was killed there.

Flodden

(ˈflɒdən)
n
(Placename) a hill in Northumberland where invading Scots were defeated by the English in 1513 and James IV of Scotland was killed. Also called: Flodden Field

Flod•den

(ˈflɒd n)

n.
a hill in NE England, in Northumberland county: the invading Scots were defeated here by the English, 1513.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Flodden - a hill in Northumberland where the invading Scots were defeated by the English in 1513
Northumberland - the northernmost county of England; has many Roman remains (including Hadrian's Wall)
2.Flodden - a battle in 1513Flodden - a battle in 1513; the English defeated the invading Scots and James IV was killed
England - a division of the United Kingdom
References in periodicals archive ?
BILLY Prior describes the Battle of Flodden as a tragedy.
1513: The Battle of Flodden Field was fought near Branxton in Northumberland in which James IV of Scotland was defeated and killed by English troops under Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey.
1513: The Battle of Flodden Field was fought near Branxton in Northumberland, in which James IV of Scotland was defeated and killed by English troops under Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey.
He will be joined by a number of other authors including John Sadler, who will be giving a talk about his new book 'Blood Divide' set during the Battle of Flodden.
Among those identied by Leicester University are relatives whose ancestors include Marmaduke Constable who survived at Bosworth and later fought in the Battle of Flodden, aged 71, but died after swallowing a frog.
85) THE battle of Flodden says as much about the bloody co-existence of Scotland and England as any other date in history.
It's of James IV on his horse just before the Battle of Flodden.
The Battle of Flodden, near Branxton, on September 9, 1513, was the last great medieval clash in Britain and ended disastrously for the Scots, with the king and much of the nation's nobility among 10,000 killed in two hours of brutal, mostly hand-to-hand combat.
Mary Webster, Larbert, Stirlingshire I'M really disappointed that you only had a one-paragraph story marking the commemorations of the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden, a far-reaching event in our history.
On September 9, 1513, English forces defeated Scottish invaders in the Battle of Flodden Field; more than 15,000 men were believed killed, including the King of Scots, James IV.
Between the 1296 Battle of Dunbar and the 1513 Battle of Flodden Field, England and Scotland were formally at peace only for two periods of about four years each.
So beyond saying that the first half of the horse's name is a colloquial shortening of William, and the second half rhymes with the Battle of Flodden, I have nothing whatsoever to impart.