Battle of Fredericksburg


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Noun1.Battle of Fredericksburg - an important battle in the American Civil War (1862)Battle of Fredericksburg - an important battle in the American Civil War (1862); the Union Army under A. E. Burnside was defeated by the Confederate Army under Robert E. Lee
American Civil War, United States Civil War, War between the States - civil war in the United States between the North and the South; 1861-1865
Old Dominion, Old Dominion State, VA, Virginia - a state in the eastern United States; one of the original 13 colonies; one of the Confederate States in the American Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
Ewell: A Soldier's Life" and "War So Terrible: A Popular History of the Battle of Fredericksburg".
The Battle of Fredericksburg was fought December 11 15, 1862, in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, between General Robert E.
Lee, witnessing the slaughter that was the December 1862 Battle of Fredericksburg, said, "It is well war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it."
Enlarged anaglyph (stereo view) photos were taken in 1863 after the Second Battle of Fredericksburg in Fredericksburg, Va.
Caption: Although this illustration was rendered following the December 11-15, 1862, Battle of Fredericksburg, the sight was all too common during the American Civil War Beneath a hill held by Stonewall Jackson's Confederate artillery, Federal burial parties are seen intering Union dead, many of whose uniforms and shoes have been removed during the night by Confederate scavengers.
The first, the Battle of Fredericksburg, was a triumph for the southern Confederates and gave hope for ultimate victory in the war - something that in the end they were denied.
Some months after his encounter with Ellen Eyre, Whitman found his brother George's name in a newspaper listing of Union soldiers wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg; within hours he was on a train headed south.
She served at the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Battle, of Antietam and the Battle of Fredericksburg, among others.
Topics include the War Department's manipulation of printing casualty lists at the battle of Fredericksburg and the postwar debate on the punishment of treason.
Upon learning of the nearly three-to-one ratio in Union to Confederate casualties at the first battle of Fredericksburg, Abraham Lincoln remarked that if a full week of such battles were fought, the Union would soon exhaust the Confederacy's manpower pool.
Seven days later, nearly 13,000 Union soldiers died in one day at the Battle of Fredericksburg.
On seeing his brother George's name listed among the casualties of the Battle of Fredericksburg, he left New York for Virginia in December 1862 to look for him.