Baucis


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Related to Baucis: Baucis and Philemon

Bau·cis

 (bô′sĭs)
n. Greek & Roman Mythology
A peasant woman of Phrygia who together with her husband Philemon received with great hospitality Zeus and Hermes disguised as men. The gods rewarded the couple by turning them in their old age into intertwining linden and oak trees.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Baucis

(ˈbɔːsɪs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a poor peasant woman who, with her husband Philemon, was rewarded for hospitality to the disguised gods Zeus and Hermes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bau•cis

(ˈbɔ sɪs)

n.
(in Greek myth) an aged Phrygian peasant woman who offered hospitality to the disguised Zeus and Hermes.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Daphnis et Chloe que sont faits Philemon et Baucis. Cette
They were rejected by everybody except for Baucis and Philemon, an old couple who only had a small, modest home to welcome them in.
167-83) not only sums up some of the general questions the text raises, such as its generic quality as a hikaya (with its contemporary implication of mimesis), but also adds a further dimension by relating the tale to Ovid's Philemon and Baucis as another important text of Mediterranean banquet literature.
She had been killed at the beginning, but Zeus pre-empted her death by changing her into a tree, an echo of the Philemon and Baucis myth.
Duessa's double transformation of Fradubio and Fraelissa is an ironic Ovidian metamorphic parody: the metamorphosis of Baucis and Philemon into trees expressed their marital fidelity [...]; that of Fradubio--and hence of Fraelissa--his inconstancy.
Yet through a corpus of imaginative tales Venice is also at once the city of Zirma, of Armilla, of Baucis, of Moriana and of Argia (to name but a few).
In it, Ariosto's newlyweds encounter Baucis and Philemon.
Se trata de la historia de Filemon y Baucis, una de las pocas de amor correspondido y feliz del poeta latino.
(4) Con razon dice tambien Fausto teniendo en mente a los viejos Filemon y a Baucis: "La resistencia, la obstinacion menoscaban el logro mas soberbio" (Goethe, 1968, p.
It seems to have been standard practice to support offstage chorus entries with an "inaudible" piano, perhaps originating with Gounod's Philemon el Baucis in 1860.