Bayard

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Bay·ard

 (bā′ərd, bī′-, bä-yär′), Seigneur de Originally Pierre Terrail. 1473-1524.
French military hero known for his fearlessness and chivalry in the Italian campaigns of Charles VIII, Louis XII, and Francis I.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bayard

(ˈbeɪəd)
n
(European Myth & Legend) a legendary horse that figures prominently in medieval romance

Bayard

(ˈbeɪəd; French bajar)
n
(Biography) Chevalier de (ʃəvalje də), original name Pierre de Terrail. ?1473–1524, French soldier, known as le chevalier sans peur et sans reproche (the fearless and irreproachable knight)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ba•yard

(ˈbeɪ ərd; Fr. baˈyar)

n.
Pierre Terrail, Seigneur de, ( “the knight without fear and without reproach” ), 1473–1524, French soldier.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bayard - French soldier said to be fearless and chivalrous (1473-1524)
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References in classic literature ?
`We shall have a day of it to-day, Bayard, my beauty; but we'll do our duty as we have done.' He stroked my neck that morning more, I think, than he had ever done before; quietly on and on, as if he were thinking of something else.
In twenty horses for saddle and draught, which I have particularly at my chateau of Pierrefonds, and which are called - Bayard, Roland, Charlemagne, Pepin, Dunois, La Hire, Ogier, Samson, Milo, Nimrod, Urganda, Armida, Flastrade, Dalilah, Rebecca, Yolande, Finette, Grisette, Lisette, and Musette.
Bayard Taylor, who could interpret the dim reasonings of animals, and understood their moral natures better than most men, would have found some way to make this poor old chap forget his troubles for a while, but we have not his kindly art, and so had to leave the raven to his griefs.
Nor ends his glory here, for his good steed Doth Brillador and Bayard far exceed; As mettled steeds compared with Rocinante, The reputation they have won is scanty.
'You've two horses in for the Wessex Cup--Silver Blaze and Bayard. Let me have the straight tip and you won't be a loser.
Your name is celebrated, your position magnificent; and then the Comte de Morcerf is a soldier, and it is pleasing to see the integrity of a Bayard united to the poverty of a Duguesclin; disinterestedness is the brightest ray in which a noble sword can shine.
Pierre Joseph Genestas was an unostentatious kind of Bayard. There was nothing romantic nor picturesque about him--he was too thoroughly commonplace.
The pictures which fill the imagination in reading the actions of Pericles, Xenophon, Columbus, Bayard, Sidney, Hampden, teach us how needlessly mean our life is; that we, by the depth of our living, should deck it with more than regal or national splendor, and act on principles that should interest man and nature in the length of our days.
His friends frequently wrangle warmly as to whether he is most like Bayard, Lancelot, or Happy Hooligan.
I say "more or less" because although Bayard Sartoris alone narrates the action in The Unvanquished, there are multiple Bayards implied within that act of narration, a problem to which I will turn in a moment.
Colonel John Sartoris and his Olympian steed, Granny and her profiteering triumph over the Yankees, the Yoknapatawpha slave community plunging to their Biblical doom in the river, young Bayard repudiating clan violence in favor of a supposedly higher neo-Sartoris moral code--these images do not merely appear in The Unvanquished, a series of romantic accidents on Faulkner's part, but rather define that book's concept of the war's end and the Sartoris family's lurching into modernity.