Bayezid II


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Bayezid II

(ˌbaɪjəˈziːd)
n
(Biography) ?1447–1512, sultan of Turkey; he greatly extended Turkish dominions in Greece and the Balkans
References in periodicals archive ?
Sultan Bayezid II, who was the son of Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror of Istanbul (Constantinopol) and ruled 31 years between 1481 and 1512 (contemporary of Christopher Columbus and Leonardo da Vinci), built a multipurpose health and social assistance complex on the banks of the Tunca river.
At the beginning of the sixteenth century, Michelangelo, still in his late twenties but basking in the glory of his masterpiece David, which he had just completed, got an invitation from Bayezid II, the Ottoman sultan, to design a bridge across the Golden Horn in Constantinople.
He was the youngest son of Sultan Bayezid II. Additional Reporting by Hend Safwat
In recent years this has dramatically changed, in particular for the early modern and Ottoman period: a collaborative research group headed by Gulru Necipoglu, Cemal Kafadar, and Cornell Fleischer is working on the catalogue of Sultan Bayezid II's royal library catalogue from 909 (1502f.); Francois Deroche has been awarded an ERC grant for his project "Saadian Intellectual and Cultural Life" (1554-1660) focused on the sultans' library preserved as a "time capsule" in the El Escorial monastery; Henning Sievert has used various documents to retrace the literary life of an eighteenth-century bureaucrat; and Tobias Heinzelmann has shrewdly employed manuscript evidence to bring to light the usage of popular religious literature--to name but a few.
Fuzuli began writing poetry at an early age, composing sometime around his twentieth year the important masnavi entitled Beng u Bade (Hashish and Wine), in which he compared the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II to hashish and the Safavid shah Ismail I to wine, much to the advantage of the latter.
An immaculate astrolabe crafted in 1505-6 for the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II recently sold at Sotheby's for $1.56 million.
Some of the elite members of the Otto-royal family were: Devlet Hatun, married to Yyldyrym Bayezid Han; Emine Hatun, daughter of Dulkadiroy-lu Mehmed Suli, married Mehmed Ecelebi Han; Alime Hatun married Murad II, Murad Han; GE-lbahar Sultan, daughter of Dulkadiroy-lu Bozkurt, married Bayezid II; and Saty Hatun married Fatih Sultan Mehmed Han.
On the Mukata'a Revenues and the Revenue Collection of Bayezid II's waqf in Amasya.
Among them are Ottoman-Mamluk relations and the complex image of Bayezid II, Venetians in the Levant in the age of Selim I, Egyptian civilian society and tax-farming in the aftermath of the Ottoman conquest, the Ottoman conquest and Egyptian culture, and the Ottoman conquest of Egypt and the arts.
Chapter three deals with Cem, a brother of Bayezid II who was compelled to flee the empire in 1482 and spent 13 years in Europe.
The Ottomans possessed a small navy as early as 1374, and under Mehmed II and Bayezid II (1481-1512) they acquired the common naval technology of the Mediterranean, adopting the oared galley as their principal vessel.