beam splitter

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beam splitter

n
(General Physics) a system that divides a beam of light, electrons, etc, into two or more paths
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References in periodicals archive ?
We optically aligned these perpendicular to each other relative to a beamsplitter which reflected infrared and transmitted visible information.
Menon, "An integrated-nanophotonics polarization beamsplitter with 2.4x2.4 [micro][m.sup.2] footprint," Nature Photonics, vol.
It can be seen from Figure 4 and from our prototyping experiment in Figure 5 that using a beamsplitter to coaxialize projector and camera operating in the same wavelength (i.e., RGB projector versus RGB camera and infrared projector versus infrared camera) causes half of the projected light to be reflected away which is power inefficient, particularly for a mobile projector with limited brightness.
As shown in Figure 4, a dichroic beamsplitter separates visible from IR emission, and directs each spectral band to two different cameras.
In order to check the departure from the Poisson distribution, we estimated another parameter which is the number of simultaneous counts in two detectors placed at the output of a beamsplitter. When two photons arrive at the exact same time to the beamsplitter, there exist four possible scenarios (Fig.
The Raman-scattered light was reflected by a dichroic beam splitter (BS45; RazorEdge 45[degrees] beamsplitter, Semrock) and the Rayleigh light was rejected.
The object beam is then recombined with the reference beam, which has previously undergone reflection at a beamsplitter, prior to being recombined at a third beamsplitter.
The first OCT technology was time domain (TD) OCT, in which light from a light source passes through a semitransparent mirror called the beamsplitter. This mirror splits the beam in two and sends half to a reference mirror at a known and adjustable distance from the detector, and the other half into the eye.
Excitation and emission light was deflected by a dichroic mirror (409/LP nm beamsplitter, AHF) into the objective (Fluar x40/1.30 oil; Zeiss) and transmitted to the camera (Visitron Systems), respectively.
Then a third acts as a beamsplitter, causing the two cesium waves to overlap and interfere with each other like two sets of ripples in a pond.