bear down

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bear 1

 (bâr)
v. bore (bôr), borne (bôrn) or born (bôrn), bear·ing, bears
v.tr.
1.
a. To carry (something) on one's person from one place to another: bore the suitcase to the station.
b. To move from one place to another while containing or supporting (something); convey or transport: a train bearing grain. See Synonyms at carry.
c. To cause to move by or with steady pressure; push: a boat borne along by the current.
d. To carry or hold in the mind over time; harbor: bear a grudge; bear ill will.
e. To have as a visible characteristic or attribute: a letter bearing his name.
2. To conduct (oneself) in a specified way: She bore herself with dignity.
3.
a. To hold up; support: This wall bears much of the weight of the roof.
b. To be accountable for; assume: bearing heavy responsibilities.
c. To have a tolerance for; endure: couldn't bear his lying; can't bear to see them leave. See Synonyms at endure.
d. To have grounds for; call for; warrant: This case bears investigation.
4.
a. To give birth to: bore six children.
b. To produce; yield: plants bearing fruit. See Synonyms at produce.
5. To offer; render: I will bear witness to the deed.
v.intr.
1. To yield fruit; produce: peach trees that bear every summer.
2. To have relevance or influence; apply: They studied how the relativity theory bears on the history of science.
3. To endure something with tolerance or patience: Bear with me while I explain what happened.
4.
a. To extend or proceed in a specified direction: The road bears to the right at the bottom of the hill.
b. To be directed or aimed in a certain direction or at a target: The guns were brought to bear upon the approaching fleet.
Phrasal Verbs:
bear down
1. To exert muscular pressure downward, as in giving birth to a baby.
2. To advance in a threatening manner: The ship bore down on our canoe.
3. To apply maximum effort and concentration: If you really bear down, you will finish the task.
bear out
To prove to be right or justified; confirm: The test results bear out our claims.
bear up
To withstand stress, difficulty, or attrition: The patient bore up well during the long illness.
Idioms:
bear a relation/relationship to
To have an association with or relevance to: That remark bears no relation to the matter at hand.
bear a resemblance/liking/similarity to
To be similar to; appear or function like.
bear down on
1. To move rapidly toward: The ship bore down on the abandoned vessel.
2. To affect in a harmful or adverse way: Financial pressures are bearing down on them.
bear fruit
To come to a satisfactory conclusion or to fruition.
bear in mind
To hold in one's mind; remember: Bear in mind that bridges freeze before roads.

[Middle English beren, from Old English beran; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Thanks to the vagaries of English spelling, bear has two past participles: born and borne. Traditionally, born is used only in passive constructions referring to birth: I was born in Chicago. For all other uses, including active constructions referring to birth, borne is the standard form: She has borne both her children at home. I have borne his insolence with the patience of a saint.

bear 2

 (bâr)
n.
1.
a. Any of various usually omnivorous mammals of the family Ursidae that have a shaggy coat and a short tail and walk with the entire lower surface of the foot touching the ground.
b. Any of various other animals, such as the koala, that resemble a true bear.
2. A large, clumsy, or ill-mannered person.
3.
a. One, such as an investor, that sells securities or commodities in expectation of falling prices.
b. A pessimist, especially regarding business conditions.
4. Slang Something that is difficult or unpleasant: The final exam was a bear.
5. Slang A highway patrol officer.
6. Slang A hairy, stocky gay man.
adj.
Characterized by falling prices: a bear market.

[Middle English bere, from Old English bera; see bher- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, probably from the proverb to sell the bear's skin before catching the bear.]

bear down

vb (intr, adverb; often foll by on or upon)
1. to press or weigh down
2. to approach in a determined or threatening manner
3. (Nautical Terms) (of a vessel) to make an approach (to another vessel, obstacle, etc) from windward
4. (Gynaecology & Obstetrics) (of a woman during childbirth) to exert a voluntary muscular pressure to assist delivery
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.bear down - exert a force with a heavy weightbear down - exert a force with a heavy weight; "The snow bore down on the roof"
press - exert pressure or force to or upon; "He pressed down on the boards"; "press your thumb on this spot"
2.bear down - contract the abdominal muscles during childbirth to ease deliverybear down - contract the abdominal muscles during childbirth to ease delivery
constrict, compress, contract, compact, press, squeeze - squeeze or press together; "she compressed her lips"; "the spasm contracted the muscle"
3.bear down - to make a rush at or sudden attack upon, as in battlebear down - to make a rush at or sudden attack upon, as in battle; "he saw Jess charging at him with a pitchfork"
rush - attack suddenly
4.bear down - exert full strength; "The pitcher bore down"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
fight, struggle, contend - be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight; "the tribesmen fought each other"; "Siblings are always fighting"; "Militant groups are contending for control of the country"
5.bear down - pay special attention to; "The lectures bore down on the political background"
accent, accentuate, emphasize, stress, punctuate, emphasise - to stress, single out as important; "Dr. Jones emphasizes exercise in addition to a change in diet"
6.bear down - exert a force or cause a strain upon; "This tax bears down on the lower middle class"
burden, saddle, charge - impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to; "He charged her with cleaning up all the files over the weekend"
Translations

w>bear down

vi
(= approach quickly)sich nahen (geh); (hawk etc)herabstoßen; to bear down on somebody/something (driver etc)auf jdn/etw zuhalten
(woman in labour)drücken
vt sepniederdrücken; he was borne down by povertyseine Armut lastete schwer auf ihm; to be borne down by the weight of …von der Last (gen)gebeugt sein