Bear grease


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Bear grease

A derisive term sometimes applied to excessive amounts of heavy grease used on someone else’s hair.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
dragged through hair, heavy with the smell of bear grease and honey.
The Old Sturbridge Village dancers will present a Washington Birthday Ball on Sunday, while beforehand OSV historians will discuss 19th-century hairdressing techniques (including bear grease and sausage curls) in "Her Crowning Glory"; etiquette for the ball in "Please Take Hands"; and 1830s must-have accessories in "Frills and Furbelows.
Turkey grease just don't cut it like bear grease," Rudy told me.
Goodsriker said the healer used bear grease, traditional song and prayer, and the foot began to heal within a week.
The bag contained a pouch of round balls, patch material, lubricant such as beeswax for the patches, tallow or bear grease, a turn screw, extra flints in their own container, a flint striker and char cloth or some other kind of tinder for starting fires, and a priming horn.
The Dutchmen traveled from village to village dining on such delicacies as beaver meat, beans lathered with bear grease and cooked pumpkin.
Film's press kit avows the storyline of Russian women hooking up with German soldiers as fresh cinematic territory, but apart from such amusing flourishes as one mismatched couple's interest sparking when their hands touch in fresh bear grease, the story plays out in deliberate, traditional style.
Bear grease, sheep's urine and chicken dung were all tried by the ancients.
Early colonists exported thousands of bear skins and tons of bear grease to Europe, according to historical accounts.
In the 1830s, women washed their hair in rum and slathered on bear grease to keep those stray strands in place, say historians at Old Sturbridge Village.
On the other hand, the hard-core traditionalist probably likes a flintlock shooting a roundhall patched with pillow ticking and lubricated with bear grease.