bear market

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Related to Bear markets: bull market

bear market

A market in which prices are falling.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bear market - a market characterized by falling prices for securitiesbear market - a market characterized by falling prices for securities
securities industry, market - the securities markets in the aggregate; "the market always frustrates the small investor"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
dumbungsmarkaðursvartsýnismarkaður
References in periodicals archive ?
People have spoken loosely of bear markets for more than 100 years, but they didn't generally attach a 20 per cent definition to them.
Interestingly, there have only been 12 bear markets (periods when the stock market drops more than 20 percent) during that period.
Are you afraid of bear markets? Going through a bear market is one of the most traumatic experiences any investor can go through.
What do these ostensibly conflicting messages imply about the likelihood that the United States is headed toward a bear market? To answer that question, we must look to past bear markets.
This time around, the index was just three per cent lower over nine days, hardly the stuff that bear markets are made of.
Since 1985, there have been two five-year bear markets: 2000-2005 and 2005-2010.
The stock market posted a string of losing days in mid-August, leading some to fear a bear market. That's premature, but we should all expect occasional bear markets.
Financial dictionary: Bull and bear markets What is it?
" The interesting thing with bear markets is that they're very short lived.
Actually, I think the more disagreeable point about the quotation is the concept that bear markets last for six to 18 months.
The bear markets in GCC and emerging markets mean high priced IPOs and even trade sales are no longer possible.
This paper discusses secular bull and bear markets and the economic conditions that prevailed since 1896.