Beatrice


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Be•a•trice

(ˈbi ə trɪs, ˈbi trɪs)

n.
a Florentine woman represented in Dante's Vita Nuova and Divine Comedy as an ideal of womanhood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Beatrice - the woman who guided Dante through Paradise in the Divine Comedy
Translations
BeataBeatrix
Beatrix
Beatrice

Beatrice

[ˈbɪətrɪs] NBeatriz
References in classic literature ?
The ensuing tale is a translation of his "Beatrice; ou la Belle Empoisonneuse," recently published in "La Revue Anti-Aristocratique." This journal, edited by the Comte de Bearhaven, has for some years past led the defence of liberal principles and popular rights with a faithfulness and ability worthy of all praise.
When, in his walk through the garden, he came to the magnificent plant that hung its purple gems beside the marble fountain, he placed a kind of mask over his mouth and nostrils, as if all this beauty did but conceal a deadlier malice; but, finding his task still too dangerous, he drew back, removed the mask, and called loudly, but in the infirm voice of a person affected with inward disease, "Beatrice! Beatrice!"
"Yes, Beatrice," answered the gardener, "and I need your help."
As Beatrice came down the garden path, it was observable that she handled and inhaled the odor of several of the plants which her father had most sedulously avoided.
And it was addressed to HER -- not to Laura or Beatrice or the Maid of Athens, but to her, Anne Shirley.
[*] Duke Lodovico was Lodovico Moro, a son of Francesco Sforza, who married Beatrice d'Este.
Little Maggie Murphy fainted dead away, and Beatrice Peralta fell an' scratched her face horrible.
I think he must be love-sick for some unknown lady,--some exalted Beatrice whom he met abroad."
The joy of Beatrice was my joy, and the sorrows of Cordelia were mine also.
We have Laura and Beatrice, Antigone and Cordelia, but we have no heroic man.
"It would take a policeman to do that, Trix, or a little man in a tall hat," said Fanny, slyly, which caused a general laugh, and made Beatrice toss her head coquettishly.
However slight the terrestrial intercourse between Dante and Beatrice or Petrarch and Laura, time changes the proportion of things, and in later days it is preferable to have fewer sonnets and more conversation.