bureaucracy

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bu·reauc·ra·cy

 (byo͝o-rŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. bu·reauc·ra·cies
1.
a. Administration of a government chiefly through bureaus or departments staffed with nonelected officials.
b. The departments and their officials as a group: promised to reorganize the federal bureaucracy.
2.
a. Management or administration marked by hierarchical authority among numerous offices and by fixed procedures: The new department head did not know much about bureaucracy.
b. The administrative structure of a large or complex organization: a midlevel manager in a corporate bureaucracy.
3. An administrative system in which the need or inclination to follow rigid or complex procedures impedes effective action: innovative ideas that get bogged down in red tape and bureaucracy.

[French bureaucratie : bureau, office; see bureau + -cratie, rule (from Old French; see -cracy).]

bureaucracy

(bjʊəˈrɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. a system of administration based upon organization into bureaus, division of labour, a hierarchy of authority, etc: designed to dispose of a large body of work in a routine manner
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government by such a system
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) government or other officials collectively
4. any administration in which action is impeded by unnecessary official procedures and red tape

bu•reauc•ra•cy

(byʊˈrɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. government by a rigid hierarchy of bureaus, administrators, and petty officials.
2. a body of officials and administrators, esp. in a government.
3. excessive multiplication of, and concentration of power in, bureaus or administrators.
4. administration characterized by excessive red tape and routine.
[1810–20; < French bureaucratie; see -cracy]

Bureaucracy

See also government.

the world of petty and officious bureaucrats. Cf. bumbledom.
the world of petty and incompetent officials.
1. a government typified by a rigid hierarchy of bureaus, administrators, and minor officials.
2. a body of administrators; officialdom.
3. administration characterized by excessive red tape and routine. — bureaucratie, adj.
turgid, misleading language, as typical of bureaucracies. Cf. federalese, officialese.
an obsession with public employment.
language typical of the U.S. federal government, especially bureaucrtic jargon. Cf. bureaucratese, officialese.
1. the realm or position of officials.
2. excessively close adherence to bureaucratie procedure.
language characteristic of officialdom, typified by polysyllabism and much periphrasis. Cf. bureaucratese, federalese.
1. any official regulations or procedures.
2. an excessive emphasis on official regulations or procedures.
3. officials in general or collectively.
designation for a pompous official, taken from a story by Samuel Foote(1755).
the practice of requiring excessive paperwork and tedious procedures before official action can be considered or completed. Also called red-tapery. — red-tapist n.

Bureaucracy

 government officials collectively, 1848.

bureaucracy

A system of government administration in which a hierarchy of nonelected professional officials is in control and often insists on strict adherence to standard procedures.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bureaucracy - nonelective government officialsbureaucracy - nonelective government officials  
Pentagon - the United States military establishment
civil service - government workers; usually hired on the basis of competitive examinations
government officials, officialdom - people elected or appointed to administer a government
2.bureaucracy - a government that is administered primarily by bureaus that are staffed with nonelective officials
authorities, government, regime - the organization that is the governing authority of a political unit; "the government reduced taxes"; "the matter was referred to higher authorities"
3.bureaucracy - any organization in which action is obstructed by insistence on unnecessary procedures and red tape
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together

bureaucracy

noun
1. government, officials, authorities, administration, ministry, the system, civil service, directorate, officialdom, corridors of power State bureaucracies tend to stifle enterprise and initiative.
2. red tape, regulations, paperwork, officialdom, officialese, bumbledom People complain about having to deal with too much bureaucracy.
Translations
البيروقراطيه: حُكْمُ الموظفينبيروقْراطِيَّةدَوْلَةٌ بيروقراطيه
byrokraciebyrokratická země
bureaukratiembedsmandsvælde
bürokraatia
byrokratiahallintokoneisto
birokracija
bürokrácia
skrifræîi, skrifstofuveldi
官僚主義
관료주의
biurokratijabiurokratinė valstybėbiurokratinisvaldininkija
birokrātijabirokrātisms
byrokraciabyrokratická krajina
byråkrati
ระบบบริหารที่มีพิธีรีตรอง
bürokrasikırtasiyecilikmerkeziyetçilik
bộ máy công chức

bureaucracy

[bjʊəˈrɒkrəsɪ] Nburocracia f (pej) → papeleo m, trámites mpl

bureaucracy

[bjʊˈrɒkrəsi] nbureaucratie f

bureaucracy

nBürokratie f

bureaucracy

[bjʊˈrɒkrəsɪ] nburocrazia

bureaucracy

(bjuˈrokrəsi) noun
1. a system of government by officials working for a government.
2. a country having such a government which uses such officials.
ˌbureauˈcratic adjective

bureaucracy

بيروقْراطِيَّة byrokracie bureaukrati Bürokratie γραφειοκρατία burocracia byrokratia bureaucratie birokracija burocrazia 官僚主義 관료주의 bureaucratie byråkrati biurokracja burocracia бюрократия byråkrati ระบบบริหารที่มีพิธีรีตรอง bürokrasi bộ máy công chức 官僚
References in periodicals archive ?
it continues to be expensive to administer and there is overwhelming evidence that many licensed premises have been forced out of business as a result of the high costs and beaurocracy involved.
It's probably thanks to the British legacy of beaurocracy and their love of paperwork that so many records of his ancestors still exist - even down to the details of their hospital visits from more than 100 years ago.
He said since the provincial governments have passed the laws but still beaurocracy is a hurdle to share the information with the citizens.
Before the Revolution Mayakovsky must have cut quite a figure with his resounding voice and imposing physique, his public appearances being causes of concern for the police; no less after the Revolution when, maybe much to his surprise, he found that beaurocracy was flourishing unabashedly and the "bourgeois" way of life went on undisturbed, only that under different guises.