Beauvoir


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Beau·voir

 (bō-vwär′), Simone de 1908-1986.
French writer, existentialist, and feminist whose works include The Second Sex (1949) and The Coming of Age (1970), a study of how different cultures view old age.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Beauvoir

(French bovwar)
n
(Biography) See de Beauvoir
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Beauvoir - French feminist and existentialist and novelist (1908-1986)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Behavioral health services were previously located in a modified residential building with 3,335 square-feet of space on Beauvoir Avenue.
Here De Beauvoir Primary School, 80 Tottenham Road, Hackney, London, N1 4BS, is put into focus to show its scores in relation to other schools in the area.
Some aspects of Simone de Beauvoir's life and work, like her relationship with Sartre, or the implications of The Second Sex may be familiar, but it is the dominance of these that has unfairly obscured other aspects of her work.
Simone de Beauvoir takes an existentialist view on women in The Second Sex where she discussed the fact that men and women belong to the same world but with an important difference.
In France, the Beauvoir granite represents one of the best examples of a PHP-RMG with a disseminated Sn-Li-Ta-Nb-Be mineralization [5] and was intensively studied during the 1980s-1990s, with the 900 m of continuous core drilling GPF1 from the "Geologie Profonde de la France" program [11].
Simone de Beauvoir's novel All Men Are Mortal (1995/1946) is one of her more neglected works.
Simone de Beauvoir afirma, em seu livro O segundo sexo, que "o mundo sempre pertenceu aos machos" (BEAUVOIR, 1970, p.80).