Beaverbrook


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Bea·ver·brook

 (bē′vər-bro͝ok′), First Baron Originally William Maxwell Aitken. 1879-1964.
Canadian-born British publisher, financier, and politician. He founded his press empire on the Daily Express (1916) and the Evening Standard (1923), held many cabinet positions during the 1940s, and was a confidant of Winston Churchill.

Beaverbrook

(ˈbiːvəˌbrʊk)
n
(Biography) 1st Baron, title of William Maxwell Aitken. 1879–1964, British newspaper proprietor and Conservative politician, born in Canada, whose newspapers included the Daily Express; minister of information (1918); minister of aircraft production (1940–41)

Bea•ver•brook

(ˈbi vərˌbrʊk)

n.
William Maxwell Aitken, Lord (1st Baron), 1879–1964, English publisher, born in Canada.
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Noun1.Beaverbrook - British newspaper publisher and politician (born in Canada); confidant of Winston Churchill (1879-1964)
References in periodicals archive ?
In forty years in Fleet Street he has dispensed wisdom, praise and blame in ample measure in public prints as widely opposed in their political allegiance as Beaverbrook's Express and The Observer or The Spectator and the New Statesman.
Mark Johnston is double-handed with Beaverbrook and Welford, while others in a ninerunner line-up are Galileo Gold, Ibn Malik, Palawan and Twin Sails.
For she was soon challenged, first by Rainbow Quest and then by Petoski, and, although she managed to fight off the subsequent Arc winner, she found Willie Carson in the Lady Beaverbrook colours that had so narrowly been denied in the epic Grundy versus Bustino duel ten years earlier a thornier prospect.
Digby isn't the first Minister to join a government but not hold the relevant party card (was Lord Beaverbrook a card-carrying Tory?).
THE book I am reading is about World War Two and it refers to Minister for Aircraft Production Lord Beaverbrook's robust attitude to cutting red tape.
A New Brunswick boy from the Miramichi area who became a millionaire businessman, a newspaper baron and a British politician, Lord Beaverbrook (William Maxwell Aitken) became minister of aircraft production when Britain needed one most.
In 1937, she married Lord Beaverbrook's nephew, William Aitken, a journalist who had been an RAF fighter pilot in World War II.
The then owner Lord Beaverbrook wanted a comic strip to rival those of competitor newspapers.
This only bolstered Low's reputation as an independent operator at the Evening Standard, especially when it was well-known that he worked for a proprietor such as Lord Beaverbrook, who was a consistent and staunch supporter of Chamberlain's appeasement policy.
The body of the Kingston Grammar School pupil, who had been strangled and sexually assaulted, was found in April 1968 in a copse near the entrance to Lord Beaverbrook's estate in Mickleham.
It fell to Beaverbrook, another Press baron, to provide his epitaph.
Press barons like Beaverbrook and Scots business tycoon Charles MacAlpine are listed, as is Lord Baden Powell, founder of the Boy Scout movement.