Bede

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Bede

 (bēd) also Bae·da or Be·da (bē′də) Known as "the Venerable Bede." 673?-735.
Anglo-Saxon theologian and historian whose major work, Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation (731), written in Latin, remains an important source of ancient English history. He introduced the method of dating events from the birth of Jesus.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bede

(biːd)
n
(Biography) Saint, known as the Venerable Bede. ?673–735 ad, English monk, scholar, historian, and theologian, noted for his Latin Ecclesiastical History of the English People (731). Feast day: May 27 or 25. Latin name: Baeda
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Bede

(bid)

also Baeda



n.
Saint ( “the Venerable Bede” ), A.D. 673?–735, English monk, historian, and theologian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bede - (Roman Catholic Church) English monk and scholar (672-735)Bede - (Roman Catholic Church) English monk and scholar (672-735)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Bede

[biːd] NBeda
the Venerable Bedeel venerable Beda
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
By using the term "bellaria" (after-course) Erasmus invites his readers to think once again of Beda, or Bedda, as he prefers to call him, (106) perhaps in order to distinguish him from his saintly namesake, Beda Venerabilis. A sneer at Beda's works and at the syndic himself is implied: Bedda, Erasmus jeers in a letter, trium phs over resumptions of his faculty and regards the rest of the world as blockheads ("Sic ornatus incedit et triumphat resumptis quasi mundus non habeat nisi fungos," Ep.