sediment

(redirected from Bedload)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Bedload: dissolved load, Suspended load

sed·i·ment

 (sĕd′ə-mənt)
n.
1. Material that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees.
2. Solid fragments of inorganic or organic material that come from the weathering of rock and are carried and deposited by wind, water, or ice.

[Latin sedimentum, act of settling, from sedēre, to sit, settle; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sediment

(ˈsɛdɪmənt)
n
1. matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid
2. (Geological Science) material that has been deposited from water, ice, or wind
[C16: from Latin sedimentum a settling, from sedēre to sit]
sedimentous adj

sed•i•ment

(ˈsɛd ə mənt)

n.
1. the matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs.
2. Geol. mineral or organic matter deposited by water, air, or ice.
[1540–50; < Latin sedimentum=sedi- (comb. form of sedēre to sit, settle) + -mentum -ment]
sed`i•men′tous, adj.

sed·i·ment

(sĕd′ə-mənt)
1. Geology Silt, sand, rocks, fossils, and other matter carried and deposited by water, wind, or ice.
2. Chemistry Particles of solid matter that settle out of a suspension to the bottom of the liquid.

sediment

  • decant - Means to pour wine, taking pains not to disturb any sediment at the bottom; decant comes from Latin de- and canthus, "angular lip of a jug."
  • allogenic, allochthonous - Geological material that has been transported and then accumulates elsewhere is allochthonous, and sediment carried by a river is allogenic.
  • lithification - The process of compaction of sediment into stone.
  • swarve - To choke with sediment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sediment - matter that has been deposited by some natural processsediment - matter that has been deposited by some natural process
matter - that which has mass and occupies space; "physicists study both the nature of matter and the forces which govern it"
alluvial deposit, alluvial sediment, alluvium, alluvion - clay or silt or gravel carried by rushing streams and deposited where the stream slows down
dregs, settlings - sediment that has settled at the bottom of a liquid
lees - the sediment from fermentation of an alcoholic beverage
lick, salt lick - a salt deposit that animals regularly lick
evaporite - the sediment that is left after the evaporation of seawater
Verb1.sediment - deposit as a sediment
posit, situate, deposit, fix - put (something somewhere) firmly; "She posited her hand on his shoulder"; "deposit the suitcase on the bench"; "fix your eyes on this spot"
sediment - settle as sediment
2.sediment - settle as sediment
settle, settle down - settle into a position, usually on a surface or ground; "dust settled on the roofs"
sediment - deposit as a sediment

sediment

sediment

noun
Matter that settles on a bottom or collects on a surface by a natural process:
deposit, dreg (often used in plural), lees, precipitate, precipitation.
Translations
ثُفْل
usazenina
aflejringbundfald
botnfall
nogulsnes

sediment

[ˈsedɪmənt] N (in liquids, boiler) → sedimento m, poso m (Geol) → sedimento m

sediment

[ˈsɛdɪmənt] nsédiment m, dépôt m

sediment

n(Boden)satz m; (in river) → Ablagerung f; (in chemical solution) → Niederschlag m, → Sediment nt

sediment

[ˈsɛdɪmənt] n (in liquids, boiler) → deposito, fondo (Geol) → sedimento

sediment

(ˈsedimənt) noun
the material that settles at the bottom of a liquid. Her feet sank into the sediment on the river bed.

sed·i·ment

n. sedimento, materia que se deposita en el fondo de un líquido.

sediment

n sedimento
References in periodicals archive ?
The provenance of the continental rift margin of the Yemen is introduced relying solely on the detrital mode and framework compositional trends of the modern loose beach and bedload wadi sediments (Garzanti et al., 2001).
The [EC.sub.1:5] and [EC.sub.a] were also consistent with the occurrence of coarser bedload deposits with low activity clays of the Mullah class and the finer over-bank deposits, which have developed into cracking clays of the Mitchell class respectively (McKenzie 1992).
Spatial variation in clam recruitment also may occur because of bedload transport within a tidal height (Emerson & Grant 1991, Jennings & Hunt 2009, Hunt 2005).
Emerson, "A method for the measurement of bedload sediment transport and passive faunal transport on intertidal sandflats," Estuaries, vol.
In addition, the rapid accumulation of bedload in the reservoir area is mostly associated with the coarse sediment transport in the Zengwen River, suggesting that the influence of dam on the SSD could be minimized if it is based on the fine-grained sediment transport (i.e., suspended sediment discharge) [13, 20].
Tenders are invited for fund construction of multiple log jam structures in tobe creek, designed to foster pool scour and bedload accumulation and to provide overhead cover and obstruct flows during winter flows.
Finally, according to some current review papers regarding the Lagrangian modelling of Saltating Sediment Transport [22, 23], a model for the transport of sediment has to include mainly the motion of saltating grains, diffusion of particles, and calculation of bedload transport rate and to improve the motion of particles representing more natural shapes.
Dadson, "The partitioning of the total sediment load of a river into suspended load and bedload: A review of empirical data," Sedimentology, vol.
In the second case, the grain size of bedload is expected to decrease as flow stage decrease (Klienhans, 2001; Bridge, 2003; Klienhans, 2004); thus, relatively coarser sediments are deposited at high flow stage, and finer sediments at low flow one (Bridge, 2003; Klienhans, 2004).
He begins with calculations of flow resistance in steep channels, then looks at fluvial bedload transport in steep streams, debris flows and important elements for assessing its hazard, and the the magnitude and frequency of torrential sediment events.
A tutorial on the piecewise regression approach applied to bedload transport data.
They are characterized by a regime where short-term events capable of transporting bedload and removing periphyton occur several times each year (Scatena & Gutpa 2012).