beerage


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beerage

(ˈbɪərɪdʒ)
n
the beer brewing industrythe members of the peerage heavily involved in the brewing industrya collective term for wealthy brewers in the US
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
At Blackstable they had always looked upon brewing with civil contempt, the Vicar made little jokes about the beerage, and it was a surprising experience for Philip to discover that Watson was such an important and magnificent fellow.
Pride Of Kentucky was trained by the distinguished pillar of the beerage Edward Courage, who did not let the fact he was confined to a wheelchair stop him being a front-rank trainer of such popular jumps stalwarts as Spanish Steps and dual Champion Chase winner Royal Relief.
There used to be a whole raft of British brewers run by the dynasts of the so-called beerage. Even some of our banks reserved their top jobs for those with the right surnames.
Publishing, one might have thought, was respectable, but the only branch of 'trade' accepted was brewing; hence the term 'the beerage' for the House of Lords.) No-one foresaw the length and depth of the coming holocaust, so it was a good idea that if one had to serve in a campaign one should do it in the Grenadier Guards.
So I put this into practice with Flanagan's Appleby blending Englishness and Irishness with Liverpoolness.'' The pub business has changed drastically from the days when it was run by ``the beerage'', the gentrified brewing families with their large groups of tied houses guaranteeing a market for their beer.
The peerage that controls Interbrew, or should I say the beerage, has the long ranging vision that they are merely stewards of the brands for their offspring, and of course public shareholders.
Many behave worse than a bunch of lager louts on a package flight to Malaga who've just been elevated to the beerage, only they wear designer jackets instead of shell suits.
The later nineteenth century, however, saw the growing influence of The Beerage, the ennobled leaders of the trade.
Another Aintree event that happens almost frequently enough to become a tradition is your correspondent having a disagreement with racecourse chairman and member of the beerage Lord Daresbury - a distinguished name which, at his insistence and not mine, must be pronounced to rhyme with raspberry, as in the blowing of.
These days he is elevated to the beerage as Lord Daresbury, which rhymes with raspberry, and yesterday he was the undisputed winner of the Tweediest Suit of The Year Award, with a window-pane check number over which some poor crofter on Uist had doubtless laboured long into the night and which Mr Badger, from The Wind In The Willows, would