beguinage

(redirected from Beguinages)

beguinage

(ˈbɛɡiːˌnɑːʒ; ˈbɛɡɪˌnɪdʒ)
n
a convent for members of the Beguine sisterhood
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
They lived by themselves or in communities called Beguinages, which could be single homes for just a few women or, as in Brugge, Brussels, and Amsterdam, walled-in rows of houses where hundreds of Beguines lived together--a village of women within a medieval town or city.
Mas adelante, Barthes destaca otra idorritmia religiosa, esta femenina: "Beguinages", pp.
Indeed, in his contribution, Walter Simons claims that more than one hundred and fifty beguinages 'are known to have existed in the southern dioceses of the Low Countries before 1300' (p.
They lived by themselves or together in so-called 'beguinages', which could be single houses for as few as a handful of beguines or, as in Brugge and Amsterdam, walled-in rows of houses (enclosing a central court with a chapel) where over a thousand beguines might live--a village of women within a medieval town or city.
The author moves from their beguinages (often walled-in row houses or single cottages), to their ministries (including preaching and spiritual direction), to their unique spiritualties (often involving mystical events), to their writings, which gave evidence of their outward compassion for the suffering Christ in the world.
It is one of only 22 beguinages remaining in Belgium.
Dans le cas des Pays-Bas, c'est le role des ordres mendiants et des beguinages sur l'amenagement de l'espace urbain qui << ne saurait etre sous-estirne >> (p.
The chronicles cited here are complex, multilayered texts incorporating material from earlier sister-books (collections of biographies of individual sisters living in specific convents), from the founding narratives of Beguinages and accounts of previous sisters' struggles to achieve regular status, as well as letters, edicts, records of church and town councils.
The bibliography (223-51) is followed by two appendices (I: Repertory of Beguine Communities [253-303], and II: The Population of Select Court Beguinages [304-13]) and an index (315-35).