beguinage

(redirected from Beguinages)

beguinage

(ˈbɛɡiːˌnɑːʒ; ˈbɛɡɪˌnɪdʒ)
n
a convent for members of the Beguine sisterhood
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: disinsection, derattage on collective buildings, homes (housing and common areas) and housing beguinages saint-quentinois
They lived by themselves or in communities called Beguinages, which could be single homes for just a few women or, as in Brugge, Brussels, and Amsterdam, walled-in rows of houses where hundreds of Beguines lived together--a village of women within a medieval town or city.
Indeed, in his contribution, Walter Simons claims that more than one hundred and fifty beguinages 'are known to have existed in the southern dioceses of the Low Countries before 1300' (p.
The author moves from their beguinages (often walled-in row houses or single cottages), to their ministries (including preaching and spiritual direction), to their unique spiritualties (often involving mystical events), to their writings, which gave evidence of their outward compassion for the suffering Christ in the world.
71) El Beguinages tambien conocido en aleman como Begijnhoven, surgio en la edad Media como un conjunto de comunidades femeninas, donde mujeres mas o menos independientes querian vivir una vida de devocion sin demasiadas ataduras.
It is one of only 22 beguinages remaining in Belgium.
Dans le cas des Pays-Bas, c'est le role des ordres mendiants et des beguinages sur l'amenagement de l'espace urbain qui << ne saurait etre sous-estirne >> (p.
The chronicles cited here are complex, multilayered texts incorporating material from earlier sister-books (collections of biographies of individual sisters living in specific convents), from the founding narratives of Beguinages and accounts of previous sisters' struggles to achieve regular status, as well as letters, edicts, records of church and town councils.
The bibliography (223-51) is followed by two appendices (I: Repertory of Beguine Communities [253-303], and II: The Population of Select Court Beguinages [304-13]) and an index (315-35).
Another fundamental change occurred when the Counterreformation helped establish new charitable institutions, the case di carita, that were geared toward the support of single women from the lower classes but also allowed some upper-class women a retreat from marriage (in ways, I might add, that resemble the beguinages of northern Europe).
He uses evidence from documents of practice such as wills, obituary books, hearth censuses, cartularies, and guild records to show when formal beguinages were founded, whether they were of the convent or court type, how many beguines inhabited these communities, how beguines were employed in the community and urban workforce, and, perhaps most revealingly, the socioeconomic status of both founders and members of beguine institutions.
Safe havens for women, beguinages, were organized when large numbers of men were away on the Crusades.