Behind the curtain


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in concealment; in secret.

See also: Curtain

References in classic literature ?
Behind the curtain all was ready on the full stage.
I prompted our medical orator with a neat speech from behind the curtain; and I never heard such applause, from such a comparatively small audience, before in my life.
'Come here!' said the flat thin voice behind the curtain; and Kim came, conscious that eyes he could not see were staring at him.
His hands were gripping the arms of the stall, his eyes were fixed upon the spot somewhere behind the curtain where this sudden little drama had been played out, as though indeed they could pierce the heavy upholstery and see beyond into the room where the very air seemed quivering still with the vehemence of the woman's outpoured scorn.
That made it all right; and when he set her down, Rose's face was so bright it was evident that some spell had been used to banish the feeling of neglect that had kept her moping behind the curtain so long.
This thought hath been carried so far, and is become so general, that some words proper to the theatre, and which were at first metaphorically applied to the world, are now indiscriminately and literally spoken of both; thus stage and scene are by common use grown as familiar to us, when we speak of life in general, as when we confine ourselves to dramatic performances: and when transactions behind the curtain are mentioned, St James's is more likely to occur to our thoughts than Drury-lane.
A fresh young voice answered from behind the curtain which closed the further end of the corridor, "No better, my Lady."
[LADY WINDERMERE hides herself behind the curtain.]
"What were you doing behind the curtain?" he asked.
There was a movement in the box, and a woman's head and shoulders appeared from behind the curtain. Juliet gave a little gasp.
She thought she recognised the figure of Lady Arabella, and instinctively drew back behind the curtain. When she had ascertained, by peeping out several times, that the lady had not seen her, she watched more carefully, all her instinctive hatred flooding back at the sight of her.
"Come, come," thought D'Artagnan, emerging from behind the curtain, "decidedly Monsieur Planchet is no fool; it is evident he has been brought up in a good school."