Belisha beacon

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Belisha beacon

(bəˈliːʃə)
n
(Civil Engineering) a flashing light in an orange globe mounted on a post, indicating a pedestrian crossing on a road
[C20: named after Leslie Hore-Belisha (1893–1957), British politician]
Translations

Belisha beacon

(o.f.) [bɪˌlɪʃəˈbiːkən] Nposte m luminoso (de cruce de peatones)
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References in periodicals archive ?
He had introduced a national driving test and pedestrian crossings with beacons - quickly named Belisha beacons - when he was Minister for Transport, and as Secretary Of State for War he instituted conscription a few months before the outbreak of the Second World War.
He had introduced a national driving test and pedestrian crossings with beacons - quickly named Belisha beacons - when he was Minister for Transport, and, as Secretary of State for War, he instituted conscription a few months before the outbreak of the Second World War.
works include (but are not limited to) the installation of drop kerbs, line markings, pedestrian crossings, belisha beacons, signage, bollards, block paving, door ironmongery, fire alarm works, railings, tarmac repairs and stair nosings.
Response: Zebra crossing to remain in place, but if funding can be found for the [pounds sterling]5,500 needed the existing Belisha beacons should be replaced with "more conspicuous Zebrite beacons".
Zebra crossings would be replaced by brightly coloured biscuit wrapping and Belisha beacons were to be replaced by flashing Teacakes.
They marched across the road between two imitation Belisha beacons, waving placards and shouting "we want a crossing".
That's right - a British road crossing, complete with orange Belisha beacons, and with original instructions for its correct positioning engraved in English on the glass frontage of a nearby French office building.
Plant in groups at the back as they will reach up to 2.4 metres and stand out like Belisha beacons.
Even if other more important stages in his career ever come to be forgotten, Lord Hore-Belisha will always be remembered as the man who instituted "Belisha Beacons".
The dimly-lit, old-fashioned belisha beacons are completely unsuitable for one of Sutton Coldfield's busiest commuter roads, they say.
You should have realised it must be at least somewhere around the 1940s, simply by observing the cars, the fashion and the Belisha beacons.
In that wonderful old shop of childhood memories were paraded sherbet dabs, sherbet sucks, gobstoppers, aniseed balls, Spangles, humbugs, lemonade powder, Penny Arrow toffee bars, black jacks, ha'penny chews, Love Hearts, Refreshers, two-tone lollypops shaped like miniature Belisha beacons, as well as the pop fizzed into many different colours and flavours by a company called Moorhouse's.